Evidence and Burden of Proof in Foreign Sovereign Immunity Litigation: A Guide for International Lawyers and Government Counsel (11)


Published in 2014 with Createspace / Amazon by Peter Fritz Walter.


©2015 Peter Fritz Walter. Some rights reserved.
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.


Publication Table of Contents


Statutes

United States Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, 1976
United Kingdom State Immunity Act, 1978

Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, 1976

United States Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act, 1976

See also Wikipedia on the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act
See also U.S. Code Collection

Public Law 94–583 (H.R. 11315), 90 STAT 2891–2898, 28 U.S.C.1330, 1391, 1602–1611, 71 AJIL 595 (1977), 15 ILM 1388 (1976).

Literature

Kane, Suing Foreign Sovereigns: A Procedural Compass, 34 STAN. L. REV. 385 (1982).

Robert B. von Mehren, The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976, 17 COLUM. J. TRANSNAT’L L. 33–66 (1978).

G. Kahale/M.A. Vega, Immunity and Jurisdiction: toward a uniform body of law in actions against foreign states, 18 COLUM. J. TRANSNAT’L L. 211–258 (1979).

N. H. Schubert, Federal question jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens against foreign states, CORNELL INT’L L. J. 463–488 (1982)

J. M. Smallwood, Recent Developments in the Anglo-American Doctrine of Foreign Sovereign Immunity, 5 INT’L TRADE L. J. 296–318 (1980).

B. M. Carl, Suing Foreign Governments in American Courts: the United States Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act in Practice, 33 SOUTHWESTERN L. J. 1009–1077 (1979).

D. Clark IV, The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976, N. C. J. INT’L L. & COMM. REG. 206–233 (1978).

K. P. Simmons, The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976, Giving the Plaintiff His Day in Court, 46 FORDHAM L. REV. 543 (1977).

Weber, The Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act of 1976: Its Origin, Meaning and Effect, 3 YALE STUD. WORLD PUB. ORD. 1 (1976).

Gamal Moursi Badr, State Immunity, The Hague, Boston, Lancaster: Martinus Nijhoff, 1984.

Ian Sinclair, The Law of Sovereign Immunity, Recent Developments, RCADI (1980-Il), pp. 121–128 and 161–170.

The Statute

§ 1330. Actions against foreign states

(a) The district courts shall have original jurisdiction without regard to amount in controversy of any nonjury civil action against a foreign state as defined in section 1603(a) of this title as to any claim for relief in personam with respect to which the foreign state is not entitled to immunity either under sections 1605–1607 of this title or under any applicable international agreement. (b) Personal jurisdiction over a foreign state shall exist as to every claim for relief over which the district courts have jurisdiction under subsection (a) where service has been made under section 1608 of this title. (c) For purposes of subsection (b), an appearance by a foreign state does not confer personal jurisdiction with respect to any claim for relief not arising out of any transaction or occurrence enumerated in sections 1605–1607 of this title.

§ 1602. Findings and declaration of purpose

The Congress finds that the determination by United States courts of the claims of foreign states to immunity from the jurisdiction of such courts would serve the interests of justice and would protect the rights of both foreign states and litigants in United States courts. Under international law, states are not immune from the jurisdiction of foreign courts insofar as their commercial activities are concerned, and their commercial property may be levied upon for the satisfaction of judgments rendered against them in connection with their commercial activities. Claims of foreign states to immunity should henceforth be decided by courts of the United States and of the States in conformity with the principles set forth in this chapter.

§ 1603. Definitions

For purposes of this chapter — (a) A ‘foreign state’, except as used in section 1608 of this title, includes a political subdivision of a foreign state or an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state as defined in subsection (b). (b) An ‘agency or instrumentality of a foreign state means any entity — (1) which is a separate legal person, corporate or otherwise, and (2) which is an organ of a foreign state or political subdivision thereof, or a majority of whose shares or other ownership interest is owned by a foreign state or political subdivision thereof, and (3) which is neither a citizen of a State of the United States as defined in section 1332 (c) and (d) of this title, nor created under the laws of any third country. (c) The ‘United States’ includes all territory and waters, continental or insular, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. (d) A ‘commercial activity’ means either a regular course of commercial conduct or a particular commercial transaction or act. The commercial character of an activity shall be determined by reference to the nature of the course of conduct or particular transaction or act, rather than by reference to its purpose. (e) A ‘commercial activity carried on in the United States by a foreign state’ means commercial activity carried on by such state and having substantial contact with the United States.

§ 1604. Immunity of a foreign state from jurisdiction

Subject to existing international agreements to which the United States is a party at the time of enactment of this Act a foreign state shall be immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States and of the States except as provided in sections 1605 to 1607 of this chapter.

§ 1605. General exceptions to the jurisdictional immunity of a foreign state

(a) A foreign state shall not be immune from the jurisdiction of courts of the United States or of the States in any case — (1) in which the foreign state has waived its immunity either explicitly or by implication, notwithstanding any withdrawal of the waiver which the foreign state may purport to effect except in accordance with the terms of the waiver; (2) in which the action is based upon a commercial activity carried on in the United States by the foreign state; or upon an act performed in the United States in connection with a commercial activity of the foreign state elsewhere; or upon an act outside the territory of the United States in connection with a commercial activity of the foreign state elsewhere and that act causes a direct effect in the United States; (3) in which rights in property taken in violation of international law are in issue and that property or any property exchanged for such property is present in the United States in connection with a commercial activity carried on in the United States by the foreign state; or that property or any property exchanged for such property is owned or operated by an agency or instrumentality of the foreign state and that agency or instrumentality is engaged in a commercial activity in the United States; (4) in which rights in property in the United States acquired by succession or gift or rights in immovable property situated in the United States are in issue; (5) not otherwise encompassed in paragraph (2) above, in which money damages are sought against a foreign state for personal injury or death, or damage to or loss of property, occurring in the United States and caused by the tortious act or omission of that foreign state or of any official or employee of that foreign state while acting within the scope of his office or employment; except this paragraph shall not apply to — (A) any claim based upon the exercise or performance or the failure to exercise or perform a discretionary function regardless of whether the discretion be abused, or (B) any claim arising out of malicious prosecution, abuse of process, libel, slander, misrepresentation, deceit, or interference with contract rights; (6) in which the action is brought, either to enforce an agreement made by the foreign state with or for the benefit of a private party to submit to arbitration all or any differences which have arisen or which may arise between the parties with respect to a defined legal relationship, whether contractual or not, concerning a subject matter capable of settlement by arbitration under the laws of the United States, or to confirm an award made pursuant to such an agreement to arbitrate, if (A) the arbitration takes place or is intended to take place in the United States, (B) the agreement or award is or may be governed by a treaty or other international agreement in force for the United States calling for the recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards, (C) the underlying claim, save for the agreement to arbitrate, could have been brought in a United States court under this section or section 1607, or (D) paragraph (1) of this subsection is otherwise applicable; or (7) not otherwise covered by paragraph (2), in which money damages are sought against a foreign state for personal injury or death that was caused by an act of torture, extrajudicial killing, aircraft sabotage, hostage taking, or the provision of material support or resources (as defined in section 2339A of title 18) for such an act if such act or provision of material support is engaged in by an official, employee, or agent of such foreign state while acting within the scope of his or her office, employment, or agency, except that the court shall decline to hear a claim under this paragraph — (A) if the foreign state was not designated as a state sponsor of terrorism under section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 App. U.S.C. 2405 (j)) or section 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2371) at the time the act occurred, unless later so designated as a result of such act or the act is related to Case Number 1:00CV03110(EGS) in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia; and (B) even if the foreign state is or was so designated, if — (i) the act occurred in the foreign state against which the claim has been brought and the claimant has not afforded the foreign state a reasonable opportunity to arbitrate the claim in accordance with accepted international rules of arbitration; or (ii) neither the claimant nor the victim was a national of the United States (as that term is defined in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act) when the act upon which the claim is based occurred. (b) A foreign state shall not be immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States in any case in which a suit in admiralty is brought to enforce a maritime lien against a vessel or cargo of the foreign state, which maritime lien is based upon a commercial activity of the foreign state: Provided, That — (1) notice of the suit is given by delivery of a copy of the summons and of the complaint to the person, or his agent, having possession of the vessel or cargo against which the maritime lien is asserted; and if the vessel or cargo is arrested pursuant to process obtained on behalf of the party bringing the suit, the service of process of arrest shall be deemed to constitute valid delivery of such notice, but the party bringing the suit shall be liable for any damages sustained by the foreign state as a result of the arrest if the party bringing the suit had actual or constructive knowledge that the vessel or cargo of a foreign state was involved; and (2) notice to the foreign state of the commencement of suit as provided in section 1608 of this title is initiated within ten days either of the delivery of notice as provided in paragraph (1) of this subsection or, in the case of a party who was unaware that the vessel or cargo of a foreign state was involved, of the date such party determined the existence of the foreign state’s interest. (c) Whenever notice is delivered under subsection (b)(1), the suit to enforce a maritime lien shall thereafter proceed and shall be heard and determined according to the principles of law and rules of practice of suits in rem whenever it appears that, had the vessel been privately owned and possessed, a suit in rem might have been maintained. A decree against the foreign state may include costs of the suit and, if the decree is for a money judgment, interest as ordered by the court, except that the court may not award judgment against the foreign state in an amount greater than the value of the vessel or cargo upon which the maritime lien arose. Such value shall be determined as of the time notice is served under subsection (b)(1). Decrees shall be subject to appeal and revision as provided in other cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction. Nothing shall preclude the plaintiff in any proper case from seeking relief in personam in the same action brought to enforce a maritime lien as provided in this section. (d) A foreign state shall not be immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States in any action brought to foreclose a preferred mortgage, as defined in the Ship Mortgage Act, 1920 (46 U.S.C. 911 and following). Such action shall be brought, heard, and determined in accordance with the provisions of that Act and in accordance with the principles of law and rules of practice of suits in rem, whenever it appears that had the vessel been privately owned and possessed a suit in rem might have been maintained. (e) For purposes of paragraph (7) of subsection (a) — (1) the terms ‘torture’ and ‘extrajudicial killing’ have the meaning given those terms in section 3 of the Torture Victim Protection Act of 1991; (2) the term ‘hostage taking’ has the meaning given that term in Article 1 of the International Convention Against the Taking of Hostages; and (3) the term ‘aircraft sabotage’ has the meaning given that term in Article 1 of the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Civil Aviation. (f) No action shall be maintained under subsection (a)(7) unless the action is commenced not later than 10 years after the date on which the cause of action arose. All principles of equitable tolling, including the period during which the foreign state was immune from suit, shall apply in calculating this limitation period. (g) Limitation on Discovery. —

(1) In general. — (A) Subject to paragraph (2), if an action is filed that would otherwise be barred by section 1604, but for subsection (a)(7), the court, upon request of the Attorney General, shall stay any request, demand, or order for discovery on the United States that the Attorney General certifies would significantly interfere with a criminal investigation or prosecution, or a national security operation, related to the incident that gave rise to the cause of action, until such time as the Attorney General advises the court that such request, demand, or order will no longer so interfere. (B) A stay under this paragraph shall be in effect during the 12-month period beginning on the date on which the court issues the order to stay discovery. The court shall renew the order to stay discovery for additional 12-month periods upon motion by the United States if the Attorney General certifies that discovery would significantly interfere with a criminal investigation or prosecution, or a national security operation, related to the incident that gave rise to the cause of action. (2) Sunset. — (A) Subject to subparagraph (B), no stay shall be granted or continued in effect under paragraph (1) after the date that is 10 years after the date on which the incident that gave rise to the cause of action occurred. (B) After the period referred to in subparagraph (A), the court, upon request of the Attorney General, may stay any request, demand, or order for discovery on the United States that the court finds a substantial likelihood would — (i) create a serious threat of death or serious bodily injury to any person; (ii) adversely affect the ability of the United States to work in cooperation with foreign and international law enforcement agencies in investigating violations of United States law; or (iii) obstruct the criminal case related to the incident that gave rise to the cause of action or undermine the potential for a conviction in such case. (3) Evaluation of evidence. — The court’s evaluation of any request for a stay under this subsection filed by the Attorney General shall be conducted ex parte and in camera. (4) Bar on motions to dismiss. — A stay of discovery under this subsection shall constitute a bar to the granting of a motion to dismiss under rules 12(b)(6) and 56 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. (5) Construction. — Nothing in this subsection shall prevent the United States from seeking protective orders or asserting privileges ordinarily available to the United States.

§ 1606. Extent of liability

As to any claim for relief with respect to which a foreign state is not entitled to immunity under section 1605 or 1607 of this chapter, the foreign state shall be liable in the same manner and to the same extent as a private individual under like circumstances; but a foreign state except for an agency or instrumentality thereof shall not be liable for punitive damages; if, however, in any case wherein death was caused, the law of the place where the action or omission occurred provides, or has been construed to provide, for damages only punitive in nature, the foreign state shall be liable for actual or compensatory damages measured by the pecuniary injuries resulting from such death which were incurred by the persons for whose benefit the action was brought.

§ 1607. Counterclaims

In any action brought by a foreign state, or in which a foreign state intervenes, in a court of the United States or of a State, the foreign state shall not be accorded immunity with respect to any counterclaim — (a) for which a foreign state would not be entitled to immunity under section 1605 of this chapter had such claim been brought in a separate action against the foreign state; or (b) arising out of the transaction or occurrence that is the subject matter of the claim of the foreign state; or (c) to the extent that the counterclaim does not seek relief exceeding in amount or differing in kind from that sought by the foreign state.

§ 1608. Service; time to answer; default

(a) Service in the courts of the United States and of the States shall be made upon a foreign state or political subdivision of a foreign state: (1) by delivery of a copy of the summons and complaint in accordance with any special arrangement for service between the plaintiff and the foreign state or political subdivision; or (2) if no special arrangement exists, by delivery of a copy of the summons and complaint in accordance with an applicable international convention on service of judicial documents; or (3) if service cannot be made under paragraphs (1) or (2), by sending a copy of the summons and complaint and a notice of suit, together with a translation of each into the official language of the foreign state, by any form of mail requiring a signed receipt, to be addressed and dispatched by the clerk of the court to the head of the ministry of foreign affairs of the foreign state concerned, or (4) if service cannot be made within 30 days under paragraph (3), by sending two copies of the summons and complaint and a notice of suit, together with a translation of each into the official language of the foreign state, by any form of mail requiring a signed receipt, to be addressed and dispatched by the clerk of the court to the Secretary of State in Washington, District of Columbia, to the attention of the Director of Special Consular Services — and the Secretary shall transmit one copy of the papers through diplomatic channels to the foreign state and shall send to the clerk of the court a certified copy of the diplomatic note indicating when the papers were transmitted. As used in this subsection, a ‘notice of suit’ shall mean a notice addressed to a foreign state and in a form prescribed by the Secretary of State by regulation. (b) Service in the courts of the United States and of the States shall be made upon an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state: (1) by delivery of a copy of the summons and complaint in accordance with any special arrangement for service between the plaintiff and the agency or instrumentality; or (2) if no special arrangement exists, by delivery of a copy of the summons and complaint either to an officer, a managing or general agent, or to any other agent authorized by appointment or by law to receive service of process in the United States; or in accordance with an applicable international convention on service of judicial documents; or (3) if service cannot be made under paragraphs (1) or (2), and if reasonably calculated to give actual notice, by delivery of a copy of the summons and complaint, together with a translation of each into the official language of the foreign state — (A) as directed by an authority of the foreign state or political subdivision in response to a letter rogatory or request or (B) by any form of mail requiring a signed receipt, to be addressed and dispatched by the clerk of the court to the agency or instrumentality to be served, or (C) as directed by order of the court consistent with the law of the place where service is to be made. (c) Service shall be deemed to have been made — (1) in the case of service under subsection (a)(4), as of the date of transmittal indicated in the certified copy of the diplomatic note; and (2) in any other case under this section, as of the date of receipt indicated in the certification, signed and returned postal receipt, or other proof of service applicable to the method of service employed. (d) In any action brought in a court of the United States or of a State, a foreign state, a political subdivision thereof, or an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state shall serve an answer or other responsive pleading to the complaint within sixty days after service has been made under this section. (e) No judgment by default shall be entered by a court of the United States or of a State against a foreign state, a political subdivision thereof, or an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state, unless the claimant establishes his claim or right to relief by evidence satisfactory to the court. A copy of any such default judgment shall be sent to the foreign state or political subdivision in the manner prescribed for service in this section.

§ 1609. Immunity from attachment and execution of property of a foreign state

Subject to existing international agreements to which the United States is a party at the time of enactment of this Act the property in the United States of a foreign state shall be immune from attachment arrest and execution except as provided in sections 1610 and 1611 of this chapter.

§ 1610. Exceptions to the immunity from attachment or execution

(a) The property in the United States of a foreign state, as defined in section 1603 (a) of this chapter, used for a commercial activity in the United States, shall not be immune from attachment in aid of execution, or from execution, upon a judgment entered by a court of the United States or of a State after the effective date of this Act, if — (1) the foreign state has waived its immunity from attachment in aid of execution or from execution either explicitly or by implication, notwithstanding any withdrawal of the waiver the foreign state may purport to effect except in accordance with the terms of the waiver, or (2) the property is or was used for the commercial activity upon which the claim is based, or (3) the execution relates to a judgment establishing rights in property which has been taken in violation of international law or which has been exchanged for property taken in violation of international law, or (4) the execution relates to a judgment establishing rights in property — (A) which is acquired by succession or gift, or (B) which is immovable and situated in the United States: Provided, That such property is not used for purposes of maintaining a diplomatic or consular mission or the residence of the Chief of such mission, or (5) the property consists of any contractual obligation or any proceeds from such a contractual obligation to indemnify or hold harmless the foreign state or its employees under a policy of automobile or other liability or casualty insurance covering the claim which merged into the judgment, or (6) the judgment is based on an order confirming an arbitral award rendered against the foreign state, provided that attachment in aid of execution, or execution, would not be inconsistent with any provision in the arbitral agreement, or (7) the judgment relates to a claim for which the foreign state is not immune under section 1605 (a)(7), regardless of whether the property is or was involved with the act upon which the claim is based. (b) In addition to subsection (a), any property in the United States of an agency or instrumentality of a foreign state engaged in commercial activity in the United States shall not be immune from attachment in aid of execution, or from execution, upon a judgment entered by a court of the United States or of a State after the effective date of this Act, if — (1) the agency or instrumentality has waived its immunity from attachment in aid of execution or from execution either explicitly or implicitly, notwithstanding any withdrawal of the waiver the agency or instrumentality may purport to effect except in accordance with the terms of the waiver, or (2) the judgment relates to a claim for which the agency or instrumentality is not immune by virtue of section 1605 (a)(2), (3), (5), or (7), or 1605 (b) of this chapter, regardless of whether the property is or was involved in the act upon which the claim is based. (c) No attachment or execution referred to in subsections (a) and (b) of this section shall be permitted until the court has ordered such attachment and execution after having determined that a reasonable period of time has elapsed following the entry of judgment and the giving of any notice required under section 1608 (e) of this chapter. (d) The property of a foreign state, as defined in section 1603 (a) of this chapter, used for a commercial activity in the United States, shall not be immune from attachment prior to the entry of judgment in any action brought in a court of the United States or of a State, or prior to the elapse of the period of time provided in subsection (c) of this section, if — (1) the foreign state has explicitly waived its immunity from attachment prior to judgment, notwithstanding any withdrawal of the waiver the foreign state may purport to effect except in accordance with the terms of the waiver, and (2) the purpose of the attachment is to secure satisfaction of a judgment that has been or may ultimately be entered against the foreign state, and not to obtain jurisdiction. (e) The vessels of a foreign state shall not be immune from arrest in rem, interlocutory sale, and execution in actions brought to foreclose a preferred mortgage as provided in section 1605 (d). (f)
(1) (A) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, including but not limited to section 208(f) of the Foreign Missions Act (22 U.S.C. 4308 (f)), and except as provided in subparagraph (B), any property with respect to which financial transactions are prohibited or regulated pursuant to section 5(b) of the Trading with the Enemy Act (50 App. U.S.C. 5 (b)), section 620(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2370 (a)), sections 202 and 203 of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701–1702), or any other proclamation, order, regulation, or license issued pursuant thereto, shall be subject to execution or attachment in aid of execution of any judgment relating to a claim for which a foreign state (including any agency or instrumentality or such state) claiming such property is not immune under section 1605 (a)(7). (B) Subparagraph (A) shall not apply if, at the time the property is expropriated or seized by the foreign state, the property has been held in title by a natural person or, if held in trust, has been held for the benefit of a natural person or persons. (2) (A) At the request of any party in whose favor a judgment has been issued with respect to a claim for which the foreign state is not immune under section 1605 (a)(7), the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of State should make every effort to fully, promptly, and effectively assist any judgment creditor or any court that has issued any such judgment in identifying, locating, and executing against the property of that foreign state or any agency or instrumentality of such state. (B) In providing such assistance, the Secretaries — (i) may provide such information to the court under seal; and (ii) should make every effort to provide the information in a manner sufficient to allow the court to direct the United States Marshall’s office to promptly and effectively execute against that property. (3) Waiver. — The President may waive any provision of paragraph (1) in the interest of national security.

§ 1611. Certain types of property immune from execution

(a) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 1610 of this chapter, the property of those organizations designated by the President as being entitled to enjoy the privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided by the International Organizations Immunities Act shall not be subject to attachment or any other judicial process impeding the disbursement of funds to, or on the order of, a foreign state as the result of an action brought in the courts of the United States or of the States. (b) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 1610 of this chapter, the property of a foreign state shall be immune from attachment and from execution, if — (1) the property is that of a foreign central bank or monetary authority held for its own account, unless such bank or authority, or its parent foreign government, has explicitly waived its immunity from attachment in aid of execution, or from execution, notwithstanding any withdrawal of the waiver which the bank, authority or government may purport to effect except in accordance with the terms of the waiver; or (2) the property is, or is intended to be, used in connection with a military activity and (A) is of a military character, or (B) is under the control of a military authority or defense agency. (c) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 1610 of this chapter, the property of a foreign state shall be immune from attachment and from execution in an action brought under section 302 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 to the extent that the property is a facility or installation used by an accredited diplomatic mission for official purposes.


State Immunity Act, 1978

United Kingdom State Immunity Act, 1978

Acts of Parliament, Chapter 33, London (Her Majesty’s Stationery Office), 1978. Reproduced in: 17 ILM 1123 (1978), Materials on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and their Property, UN-Doc. ST/LEG­ /SER.B./20, New York: United Nations, 1982, pp. 41 ff., Georges R. Delaume, Transnational Contracts, Vol. III, Appendix I, Booklet D, Gamal Moursi Badr, State Immunity (1984), Appendix III.

Parliamentary Debates

Hansard, House of Lords Debates
Vol. 387, cols. 1976–7 of December 13, 1977; Vol. 388, cols. 51–78 of January 17, 1978

Hansard, House of Commons Debates
Vol. 949, cols. 405–420 of May 3, 1978, col. 937 of May 5, 1978, Vol. 951, cols. 841–845 of June 13, 1978, Vol. 953, cols. 616–620 of July 5, 1978, Vol. 954, col. 830 of July 20, 1978.

Literature

Fox, Hazel
The Law of State Immunity
Oxford: Oxford Library of International Law, 2004

Higgins, Rosalynn
Certain Unresolved Aspects of the Law of State Immunity
XXIX NETH.INT’L L.REV. 265 (1982)

F. A. Mann
The State Immunity Act 1978
50 BRIT.Y.B.INT’L L. 43–62 (1979),

Georges R. Delaume
The State Immunity Act of the United Kingdom
73 AJIL 185–199 (1979)

S. Bird
The State Immunity Act of 1978
13 INT’L LAWYER 619–643 (1979)

Robin C.A. White
The State Immunity Act 1978
42 MODERN L.REV. 72–79 (1979)

D.W. Bowett
The State Immunity Act 1978
37 CAMBRIDGE L.J. 193–196 (1978)

Ian Sinclair
The Law of Sovereign Immunity. Recent Developments
167 RCADI (1980-II) 117, 257–265

Gamal Moursi Badr
State Immunity
The Hague, Boston, Lancaster: Martinus Nijhoff, 1984

Ian Sinclair
The Law of Sovereign Immunity
Recent Developments, RCADI (1980-Il), pp. 121–128 and 161–170

The Statute

An Act to make new provision with respect to proceedings in the United Kingdom by or against other States. to provide for the effect of judgments given against the United Kingdom in the courts of States parties to the European Convention on State Immunity; to make new provision with respect to the immunities and privileges of heads of State; and for connected purposes.

[20th July 1978] PART I. PROCEEDINGS IN UNITED KINGDOM BY OR AGAINST OTHER STATES

Immunity from jurisdiction

1. — (1) A State is immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United Kingdom except as provided in the following provisions of this Part of this Act. (2) A court shall give effect to the immunity conferred by this section even though the State does not appear in the proceedings in question.

Exceptions from immunity

2. — (1) A State is not immune as respects proceedings in respect of which it has submitted to the jurisdiction of the courts of the United Kingdom. (2) A State may submit after the dispute giving rise to the proceedings has arisen or by a prior written agreement; but a provision in any agreement that it is to be governed by the law of the United Kingdom is not to be regarded as a submission. (3) A State is deemed to have submitted — (a) if it has instituted the proceedings; or (b) subject to subsections (4) and (5) below, if it has intervened or taken any step in the proceedings. (4) Subsection (3)(b) above does not apply to intervention or any step taken for the purpose only of — (a) claiming immunity; or (b) asserting an interest in property in circumstances such that the State would have been entitled to immunity if the proceedings had been brought against it. (5) Subsection (3)(b) above does not apply to any step taken by the State in ignorance of facts entitling it to immunity if those facts could not reasonably have been ascertained and immunity is claimed as soon as reasonably practicable. (6) A submission in respect of any proceedings extends to any appeal but not to any counterclaim unless it arises out of, the same legal relationship or facts as the claim. (7) The head of a State’s diplomatic mission in the United Kingdom, or the person for the time being performing his functions, shall be deemed to have authority to submit on behalf of the State in respect of any proceedings; and any person who has entered into a contract on behalf of and with the authority of a State shall be deemed to have authority to submit on its behalf in respect of proceedings arising out of the contract. 3. — (1) A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to — (a) a commercial transaction entered into by the State or (b) an obligation of the State which by virtue of a contract (whether a commercial transaction or not) falls to be performed wholly or partly in the United Kingdom. (2) This section does not apply if the parties to the dispute are States or have otherwise agreed in writing; and subsection (1)(b) above does not apply if the contract (not being a commercial transaction) was made in the territory of the State concerned and the obligation in question is governed by its administrative law. (3) In this section ‘commercial transaction’ means — (a) any contract for the supply of goods or services; (b) any loan or other transaction for the provision of finance and any guarantee or indemnity in respect of any such transaction or of any other financial obligation; and (c) any other transaction or activity (whether of a commercial, industrial, financial, professional or other similar character) into which a State enters or in which it engages otherwise than in the exercise of sovereign authority; but neither paragraph of subsection (1) above applies to a contract of employment between a State and an individual. 4. — (1) A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to a contract of employment between the State and an individual where the contract was made in the United Kingdom or the work is to be wholly or partly performed there. (2) Subject to subsections (3) and (4) below, this section does not apply if — (a) at the time when the proceedings are brought the individual is a national of the State concerned; or (b) at the time when the contract was made the individual was neither a national of the United Kingdom nor habitually resident there; or (c) the parties to the contract have otherwise agreed in writing. (3) Where the work is for an office, agency or establishment maintained by the State in the United Kingdom for commercial purposes, subsection (2)(a) and (b) above do not exclude the application of this section unless the individual was, at the time when the contract was made, habitually resident in that State.
(4) Subsection (2)(c) above does not exclude the application of this section where the law of the United Kingdom requires the proceedings to be brought before a court of the United Kingdom. (5) In subsection (2)(b) above ‘national of the United Kingdom’ means a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies, a person who is a British subject by virtue of section 2, 13 or 16 of the British Nationality Act 1948 or by virtue of the British Nationality Act 1965, a British protected person within the meaning of the said Act of 1948 or a citizen of Southern Rhodesia. (6) In this section ‘proceedings relating to a contract of employment’ includes proceedings between the parties to such a contract in respect of any statutory rights or duties to which subject as employer or employee. 5. A State is not immune as respects proceedings in respect of — (a) death or personal injury; or (b) damage to or loss of tangible property, caused by an act or omission in the United Kingdom. 6. — (1) A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to — (a) any interest of the State in, or its possession or use of, immovable property in the United Kingdom; or (b) any obligation of the State arising out of its interest in, or its possession or use of, any such property. (2) A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to any interest of the State in movable or immovable property, being an interest arising by way of succession, gift or bona vacantia. (3) The fact that a State has or claims an interest in any property shall not preclude any court from exercising in respect of it any jurisdiction relating to the estates of deceased persons or persons of unsound mind or to insolvency, the winding up of companies or the administration of trusts. (4) A court may entertain proceedings against a person other than a State notwithstanding that the proceedings relate to property — (a) which is in the possession or control of a State; or (b) in which a State claims an interest, if the State would not have been immune had the proceedings been brought against it or, in a case within paragraph (b) above, if the claim is neither admitted nor supported by prima facie evidence. 7. — A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to — (a) any patent, trademark, design or plant breeders’ rights belonging to the State and registered or protected in the United Kingdom or for which the State has applied in the United Kingdom; (b) an alleged infringement by the State in the United Kingdom of any patent, trademark, design, plant breeders’ rights or copyright; or (c) the right to use a trade or business name in the United Kingdom. 8. — (1) A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to its membership of a body corporate, an unincorporated body or a partnership which– (a) has members other than States; and (b) is incorporated or constituted under the law of the United Kingdom or is controlled from or has its principal place of business in the United Kingdom, being proceedings arising between the State and the body or its other members or, as the case may be, between the State and the other partners. (2) This section does not apply if provision to the contrary has been made by an agreement in writing between the parties to the dispute or by the constitution or other instrument establishing or regulating the body or partnership in question. 9. — (1) Where a State has agreed in writing to submit a dispute which has arisen, or may arise, to arbitration, the State is not immune as respects proceedings in the courts of the United Kingdom which relate to the arbitration. (2) This section has effect subject to any contrary provision in the arbitration agreement and does not apply to any arbitration agreement between States. 10. — (1) This section applies to — (a) Admiralty proceedings: and (b) proceedings on any claim which could be made the subject of Admiralty proceedings. (2) A State is not immune as respects — (a) an action in rem against a ship belonging to that State; or (b) an action in personam for enforcing a claim in connection with such a ship, if, at the time when the cause of action arose, the ship was in use or intended for use for commercial purposes. (3) Where an action in rem is brought against a ship belonging to a State for enforcing a claim in connection with another ship belonging to that State, subsection (2)(a) above does not apply as respects the first-mentioned ship unless, at the time when the cause of action relating to the other ship arose, both ships were in use or intended for use for commercial purposes. (4) A State is not immune as respect — (a) an action in rem against a cargo belonging to that State if both the cargo and the ship carrying it were, at the time when the cause of action arose, in use or intended for use for commercial purposes; or (b) an action in personam for enforcing a claim in connection with such a cargo if the ship carrying it was then in use or intended for use as aforesaid. (5) In the foregoing provisions references to a ship or cargo belonging to a State include references to a ship or cargo in its possession or control or in which it claims an interest; and, subject to subsection (4) above, subsection (2) above applies to property other than a ship as it applies to a ship. (6) Sections 3 to 5 above do not apply to proceedings of the kind described in subsection (1) above if the State in question is a party to the Brussels Convention and the claim relates to the operation of a ship owned or operated by that State, the carriage of cargo or passengers on any such ship or the carriage of cargo owned by that State on any other ship. 11.– A State is not immune as respects proceedings relating to its liability for — (a) value added tax, any duty of customs or excise or any agricultural levy; or (b) rates in respect of premises occupied by it for commercial purposes.

Procedure

12. — (1) Any writ or other document required to be served for instituting proceedings against a State shall be served by being transmitted through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the State and service shall be deemed to have been effected when the writ or document is received at the Ministry. (2) Any time for entering an appearance (whether prescribed. by rules of court or otherwise) shall begin to run two months after the date on which the writ or document is received as aforesaid. (3) A State which appears in proceedings cannot thereafter object that subsection (1) above has not been complied with in the case of those proceedings. (4) No judgment in default of appearance shall be given against a State except on proof that subsection (1) above has been complied with and that the time for entering an appearance as extended by subsection (2) above has expired. (5) A copy of any judgment given against a State in default of appearance shall be transmitted through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of that State and any time for applying to have the judgment set aside (whether prescribed by rules of court or otherwise) shall begin to run two months after the date on which the copy of the judgment is received at the Ministry. (6) Subsection (1) above does not prevent the service of a writ or other document in any manner to which the State has agreed and subsections (2) and (4) above do not apply where service is effected in any such manner. (7) This section shall not be construed as applying to proceedings against a State by way of counterclaim or to an action in rem; and subsection (1) above shall not be construed as affecting any rules of court whereby leave is required for the service of process outside the jurisdiction. 13. — (1) No penalty by way of committal or fine shall be imposed in respect of any failure or refusal by or on behalf of a State to disclose or produce any document or other information for the purposes of proceedings to which it is a party. (2) Subject to subsections (3) and (4) below — (a) relief shall not be given against a State by way of injunction or order for specific performance or for the recovery of land or other property; and (b) the property of a State shall not be subject to any process for the enforcement of a judgment or arbitration award or, in an action in rem, for its arrest, detention or sale. (3) Subsection (2) above does not prevent the giving of any relief or the issue of any process with the written consent of the State concerned; and any such consent (which may be contained in a prior agreement) may be expressed so as to apply to a limited extent or generally; but a provision merely submitting to the jurisdiction of the courts is not to be regarded as a consent for the purposes of this subsection. (4) Subsection (2)(b) above does not prevent the issue of any process in respect of property which is for the time being in use or intended for use for commercial purposes; but, in a case not falling within section 10 above, this subsection applies to property of a State party to the European Convention on State Immunity only if — (a) the process is for enforcing a judgment which is final within the meaning of section 18(1)(b) below and the State has made a declaration under Article 24 of the Convention; or (b) the process is for enforcing an arbitration award. (5) The head of a State’s diplomatic mission in the United Kingdom, or the person for the time being performing his functions, shall be deemed to have authority to give on behalf of the State any such consent as is mentioned in subsection (3) above and, for the purposes of subsection (4) above, his certificate to the effect that any property is not in use or intended for use by or on behalf of the State for commercial purposes shall be accepted as sufficient evidence of that fact unless the contrary is proved. (6) In the application of this section to Scotland — (a) the reference to ‘injunction’ shall be construed as a reference to ‘interdict’; (b) for paragraph (b) of subsection (2) above there shall be substituted the following paragraph — ‘(b) the property of a State shall not be subject to any diligence for enforcing a judgment or order of a court or a decree arbitral or, in an action in rem, to arrestment or sale.’; and (c) any reference to ‘process’ shall be construed as a reference to ‘diligence’, any reference to ‘the issue of any process’ as a reference to ‘the doing of diligence’ and the reference in subsection (4)(b) above to ‘an arbitration award’ as a reference to ‘a decree arbitral.’

Supplementary Provisions

14. — (1) The immunities and privileges conferred by this Part of this Act apply to any foreign or commonwealth State other than the United Kingdom, and references to a State include references to — (a) the sovereign or other head of that State in his public capacity; (b) the government of that State; and (c) any department of that government, but not to any entity (hereafter referred to as a ‘separate entity’) which is distinct from the executive organs of the government of the State and capable of suing or being sued. (2) A separate entity is immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United Kingdom if, and only if — (a) the proceedings relate to anything done by it in the exercise of sovereign authority; and (b) the circumstances are such that a State (or, in the case of proceedings to which section 10 above applies, a State which is not a party to the Brussels Convention) would have been so immune. (3) If a separate entity (not being a State’s central bank or other monetary authority) submits to the jurisdiction in respect of proceedings in the case of which it is entitled to immunity by virtue of subsection (2) above, subsections (1) to (4) of section 13 above shall apply to it in respect of those proceedings as if references to a State were references to that entity. (4) Property of a State’s central bank or other monetary authority shall not be regarded for the purposes of subsection (4) of section 13 above as in use or intended for use for commercial purposes; and where any such bank or authority is a separate entity subsections (1) to (3) of that section shall apply to it as if references to a State were references to the bank or authority. (5) Section 12 above applies to proceedings against the constituent territories of a federal State; and Her Majesty may by Order in Council provide for the other provisions of this Part of this Act to apply to any such constituent territory specified in the Order as they apply to a State. (6) Where the provisions of this Part of this Act do not apply to a constituent territory by virtue of any such Order subsections (2) and (3) above shall apply to it as if it were a separate entity. 15. — (1) If it appears to Her Majesty that the immunities and privileges conferred by this Part of this Act in relation to any State — (a) exceed those accorded by the law of that State in relation to the United Kingdom; or (b) are less than those required by any treaty, convention or other international agreement to which that State and the United Kingdom are parties. Her Majesty may by Order in Council provide for restricting or, as the case may be, extending those immunities and privileges to such extent as appears to Her Majesty to be appropriate. (2) Any statutory instrument containing an Order under this section shall be subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament. 16. — (1) This Part of this Act does not affect any immunity or privilege conferred by the Diplomatic Privileges Act 1964 or the Consular Relations Act 1968; and — (a) section 4 above does not apply to proceedings concerning the employment of the members of a mission within the meaning of the Convention scheduled to the said Act of 1964 or of the members of a consular post within the meaning of the Convention scheduled to the said Act of 1968; (b) section 6(1) above does not apply to proceedings concerning a State’s title to or its possession of property used for the purposes of a diplomatic mission. (2) This Part of this Act does not apply to proceedings relating to anything done by or in relation to the armed forces of a State while present in the United Kingdom and. in particular, has effect subject to the Visiting Forces Act 1952. (3) This Part of this Act does not apply to proceedings to which section 17(6) of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 applies. (4) This Part of this Act does not apply to criminal proceedings. (5) This Part of this Act does not apply to any proceedings relating to taxation other than those mentioned in section 11 above. 17.–(1) In this Part of this Act — ‘the Brussels Convention’ means the International Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules Concerning the Immunity of State-owned Ships signed in Brussels on 10th April 1926; ‘commercial purposes’ means purposes of such transactions or activities as are mentioned in section 3(3) above; ‘ship’ includes hovercraft. (2) In sections 2(2) and 13(3) above references to an agreement include references to a treaty, convention or other international agreement. (3) For the purposes of sections 3 to 8 above the territory of the United Kingdom shall be deemed to include any dependent territory in respect of which the United Kingdom is a party to the European Convention on State Immunity. (4) In sections 3(l), 4(1), 5 and 16(2) above references to the United Kingdom include references to its territorial waters and any area designated under section 1(7) of the Continental Shelf Act 1964. (5) In relation to Scotland in this Part of this Act ‘action in rem’ means such an action only in relation to Admiralty proceedings.

PART II. JUDGMENTS AGAINST UNITED KINGDOM IN CONVENTION

STATES

18. — (1) This section applies to any judgment given against the United Kingdom by a court in another State party to the European Convention on State immunity, being a judgment — (a) given in proceedings in which the United Kingdom was not entitled to immunity by virtue of provisions corresponding to those of sections 2 to ii above; and (b) which is final, that is. to say, which is not or is no longer subject to appeal or, if given in default of appearance, liable to be set aside. (2) Subject to section 19 below, a judgment to which this section applies shall be recognised in any court in the United Kingdom as conclusive between the parties thereto in all proceedings founded on the same cause of action and may be relied on by way of defence or counter-claim in such proceedings. (3) Subsection (2) above (but not section 19 below) shall have effect also in relation to any settlement entered into by the United Kingdom before a court in another State party to the Convention which under the law of that State is treated as equivalent to a judgment. (4) In this section references to a court in a State party to the Convention include references to a court in any territory in respect of which it is a party.

19. — (1) A court need not give effect to section 18 above in the case of a judgment — (a) if to do so would be manifestly contrary to public policy or if any party to the proceedings in which the judgment was given had no adequate opportunity to present his case; or (b) if the judgment was given without provisions corresponding to those of section 12 above having been complied with and the United Kingdom has not entered an appearance or applied to have the judgment set aside. (2) A court need not give effect to section 18 above in the case of a judgment — (a) if proceedings between the same parties’ based on the same facts and having the same purpose — (i) are pending before a court in the United Kingdom and were the first to be instituted; or (ii) are pending before a court in another State party to the Convention, were the first to be instituted and may result in a judgment to which that section will apply; or (b) if the result of the judgment is inconsistent with the result of another judgment given in proceedings between the same parties and — (i) the other judgment is by a court in the United Kingdom and either those proceedings were the first to be instituted or the judgment of that court was given before the first-mentioned judgment became final within the meaning of subsection (1)(b) of section 18 above; or (ii) the other judgment is by a court in another State party to the Convention and that section has already become applicable to it. (3) Where the judgment was given against the United Kingdom in proceedings in respect of which the United Kingdom was not entitled to immunity by virtue of a provision corresponding to section 6(2) above, a court need not give effect to section 18 above in respect of the judgment if the court that gave the judgment — (a) would not have had jurisdiction in the matter if it had applied rules of jurisdiction corresponding to those applicable to such matters in the United Kingdom; or (b) applied a law other than that indicated by the United Kingdom rules of private international law and would have reached a different conclusion if it had applied the law so indicated. (4) In subsection (2) above references to a court in the United Kingdom include references to a court in any dependent territory in respect of which the United Kingdom is a party to the Convention, and references to a court in another State party to the Convention include references to a court in any territory in respect of which it is a party.

PART III. MISCELLANEOUS AND SUPPLEMENTARY

20. — (1) Subject to the provisions of this section and to any necessary modifications, the Diplomatic Privileges Act 1964 shall apply to — (a) a sovereign or other head of State; (b) members of his family forming part of his household; and (c) his private servants, as it applies to the head of a diplomatic mission, to members of his family forming part of his household and to his private servants. (2) The immunities and privileges conferred by virtue of subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall not be subject to the restrictions by reference to nationality or residence mentioned in Article 37(1) or 38 in Schedule 1 to the said Act of 1964. (3) Subject to any direction to the contrary by the Secretary of State, a person on whom immunities and privileges are conferred by virtue of subsection (1) above shall be entitled to the exemption conferred by section 8(3) of the Immigration Act 1971. (4) Except as respects value added tax and duties of customs or excise, this section does not affect any question whether a person is exempt from, or immune as respects proceedings relating to, taxation. (5) This section applies to the sovereign or other head of any State on which immunities and privileges are conferred by Part I of this Act and is without prejudice to the application of that Part to any such sovereign or head of State in his public capacity. 21. A certificate by or on behalf of the Secretary of State shall be conclusive evidence on any question — (a) whether any country is a State for the purposes of Part I of this Act, whether any territory is a constituent territory of a federal State for those purposes or as to the person or persons to be regarded for those purposes as the head or government of a State; (b) whether a State is a party to the Brussels Convention mentioned in Part I of this Act; (c) whether a State is a party to the European Convention on State Immunity, whether it has made a declaration under Article 24 of that Convention or as to the territories in respect of which the United Kingdom or any other State is a party; (d) whether, and if so when, a document has been served or received as mentioned in Section 12(1) or (5) above. 22. — (1) In this Act ‘court’ includes any tribunal or body exercising judicial functions; and references to the courts or law of the United Kingdom include references to the courts or law of any part of the United Kingdom. (2) In this Act references to entry of appearance and judgments in default of appearance include references to any corresponding procedures. (3) In this Act ‘the European Convention on State Immunity’ means the Convention of that name signed in Basle on 16th May 1972. (4) In this Act ‘dependent territory’ means — (a) any of the Channel Islands; (b) the Isle of Man; (c) any colony other than one for whose external relations a country other than the United Kingdom is responsible; or (d) any country or territory outside Her Majesty’s dominions in which Her Majesty has jurisdiction in right of the government of the United Kingdom. (5) Any power conferred by this Act to make an Order in Council includes power to vary or revoke a previous Order. 23. — (1) This Act may be cited as the State Immunity Act 1978. (2) Section 13 of the M8 Administration of Justice (MiscellaneousProvisions) Act 1938 and section 7 of the M9 Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1940 (which become unnecessary in consequence of Part I of this Act) are hereby repealed. (3) Subject to subsection (4) below, Parts I and II of this Act do not apply to proceedings in respect of matters that occurred before the date of the coming into force of this Act and, in particular– (a) sections 2(2) and 13(3) do not apply to any prior agreement, and (b) sections 3, 4 and 9 do not apply to any transaction, contract or arbitration agreement, entered into before that date. (4) Section 12 above applies to any proceedings instituted after the coming into force of this Act. (5) This Act shall come into force on such date as may be specified by an order made by the Lord Chancellor by statutory instrument. (6) This Act extends to Northern Ireland. (7) Her Majesty may by Order in Council extend any of the provisions of this Act, with or without modification, to any dependent territory.


Annex 1

Peter Fritz Walter, Les problèmes de preuve en matière d’immunités de juridiction et d’exécution des états étrangers, Thèse soutenu le 12 décembre 1987 à la Faculté de Droit de l’Université de Genève

Conclusion Générale

L’examen des lois nationales en matière d’immunité des états étrangers a révélé l’existence de principes communs concernant la répartition du fardeau de la preuve.

L’immunité de juridiction

Quant a l’immunité de juridiction, nous pouvons conclure que, en principe, la preuve incombe à l’état étranger par rapport aux faits qui justifient sa demande d’immunité. L’état étranger commence a produire des preuves concernant l’applicabilité de la loi d’immunité et l’existence d’un acte gouvernemental (de iure imperii), c’est-à-dire fournir une preuve prima facie à cet égard.

Toutefois, l’état étranger n’est pas obligé, pour la production de cette preuve, de réfuter toutes les exceptions à l’immunité de juridiction, mais seulement celles don’t le demandeur s’est prévalues dans sa plaidoirie. Il incombe en effet au demandeur un certain fardeau de démonstration relatif aux exceptions qu’il désire avoir appliquées par la cour. Si le demandeur ne fournit pas une telle base factuelle (some basis), l’état étranger peut produire sa preuve prima facie de façon toute générale et, sans se référer à une exception particulière, invoquer l’existence d’un acte gouvernemental. Pour ce faire, l’état étranger peut, par exemple, jurer dans un affidavit, fourni par l’un de ces officiels, que l’acte en cause fut revêtu d’un caractère public, gouvernemental.

Si l’état étranger réussit à fournir une preuve suffisante, il s’est acquitté de son fardeau de présentation qui alors se déplace au demandeur. Dans ce cas, il existe une présomption en faveur d’immunité de juridiction.

Pour réfuter cette présomption, le demandeur doit démontrer en détail, et prouver, l’applicabilité des exceptions dont il s’est prévalues dans sa plaidoirie. S’il réussit, l’immunité de juridiction sera refusée par la cour. S’il ne réussit pas à réfuter le prima facie case, produit par l’état étranger, l’immunité sera accordée.

Si l’état étranger ne réussit déjà pas à fournir une preuve prima facie, la cour peut en principe refuser l’octroi de l’immunité. Dans ce cas, il n’existe pas de présomption en faveur de la compétence, puisque le demandeur, à ce stade, n’a que démontré les exceptions dont il se prévaut. Par conséquence, la cour est libre d’estimer le poids des arguments de chacune des parties, et de décider la question d’immunité d’après l’ensemble des faits qui lui ont été soumis par les parties. Toutefois, la cour ne peut pas sans autre dénier l’immunité de juridiction seulement à cause du fait que l’état étranger n’a rien fait pour se défendre ou ne paraît pas dans l’instance. Dans ce cas, la décision devra se baser sur l’ensemble des faits et l’octroi de l’immunité ou son refus dépendront du poids des preuves offertes par le demandeur.

Le fardeau de persuasion, ou le ‘risque d’immunité, en matière d’immunité de juridiction, est du côté de l’état étranger. Cela veut dire que l’état étranger porte le risque d’être débouté de sa demande d’immunité dans le cas d’un doute subsistant sur un fait litigieux (non liquet), une fois que le demandeur a pour le moins établi une preuve prima facie par rapport à l’applicabilité d’une exception. Dans ce sens, on peut parler d’une règle de preuve ‘in dubio contra immunitate.’

Cette règle de preuve vaut a fortiori pour les organismes d’un état étranger, soit parce qu’ils sont assimilés à ce dernier, soit parce que leur immunité est encore plus restreinte que celle des états dans les lois nationales (présomption de compétence ou de non-immunité).

L’immunité d’exécution

En ce qui concerne l’immunité d’exécution, la règle dite absolue traditionnelle n’a pas été remplacée par une nouvelle doctrine de droit international comme ce fut le cas en matière de juridiction. Par conséquent, cette règle est encore ‘absolue’ dans le sens qu’elle accorde une immunité ‘complète,’ et non seulement ‘résiduelle.’

Ceci se montre dans le fait que, pour que cette règle produise son effet de présomption, il n’est pas nécessaire qu’il existe une base factuelle, une preuve prima facie, en sa faveur. Seules les lois britannique, singapourienne et pakistanaise exigent, pour que cette règle s’érige en présomption, un certificat d’ambassadeur témoignant à l’usage non-commercial des biens étatiques en cause.

Pourtant, un tel certificat exige beaucoup moins de la part de l’état étranger que de fournir une preuve prima facie; l’exigence d’un tel certificat fut en outre déclarée conforme aux règles du doit international public par la Cour Constitutionnelle de l’Allemagne dans sa décision du 13 décembre 1977. Par conséquent, la preuve des conditions factuelles d’une exception à la règle d’immunité d’exécution incombe au demandeur, de sorte que celui-ci doit fournir une preuve prima facie à cet égard.

Si le demandeur réussit à fournir cette preuve, l’état étranger peut, par simplement réfuter celle-ci, parvenir à l’octroi de l’immunité.

Si, par contre, l’état étranger n’arrive pas à réfuter la preuve prima facie, le demandeur doit néanmoins prouver, par une prépondérance de probabilité (preponderance of probability) l’applicabilité d’une exception, car la présomption d’immunité ne peut pas être réfutée par une simple preuve prima facie. Ainsi, c’est au demandeur qu’incombe le fardeau de persuasion, le ‘risque d’immunité’ proprement dit, dans le cas du non liquet, et la propriété de l’état étranger qui sert à des fins gouvernementales est effectivement protégée contre toute mesure d’exécution.

Pour certains types de propriété, par exemple propriété militaire ou propriété d’une banque centrale étrangère, les lois sont encore plus strictes. Elles ne diffèrent que dans la mesure où elles refusent toute exécution, en accordant ainsi une immunité parfaitement absolue, ou elles permettent une exécution très limitée.

Dans tous les cas examinés, les moyens de preuve communs sont admis. Il y a toutefois une certaine préférence pratique pour l’affidavit et le témoignage écrit. En ce qui concerne le Canada, une modification est à noter: l’Office de Révision du Code Civil a adopté trois articles sur l’immunité des états. Dans l’un de ces articles, il est prévu que le souverain étranger n’est pas obligé de donner son témoignage. Ce règlement n’aura toutefois pas d’influence sur l’attribution du fardeau de la preuve, puisque le témoignage est seulement l’un de différents moyens de preuve.

De plus, la répartition du fardeau de la preuve ne dépend pas de la disponibilité de certains moyens de preuve.

Les faits pertinents à prouver sont ceux qui sont énumérés dans les différentes exceptions prévues par les lois d’immunité. L’état étranger, pour la preuve prima facie d’un acte public, gouvernemental, peut invoquer notamment d’avoir agi à l’intérieur de l’un des domaines ‘sensiblement politiques’ qui ont été élaborés par la jurisprudence fédérale américaine à la suite du FSIA 1976, et qui forment, dans leur ensemble, un certain noyau à l’intérieur duquel l’immunité de juridiction jouit toujours d’une vaste reconnaissance.

Thèses

1. La doctrine restrictive de l’immunité de juridiction constitue une nouvelle règle de droit international public. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’une atténuation du principe d’immunité absolue, par l’admission d’une exception additionnelle — activité commerciale, mais d’une règle essentiellement différente. Cette règle a remplacé la règle antérieure.

2. La nouvelle règle d’immunité restrictive n’accorde l’immunité de juridiction aux états étrangers que sous la condition que l’activité litigieuse soit de nature publique, gouvernementale. Or, cette nouvelle règle d’immunité rétablit, pour ainsi dire, la règle originale posant la compétence intégrale des cours de l’état du for sur son territoire.

3. Il en découle que la preuve des faits qui entraînent l’octroi de l’immunité, incombe à l’état étranger. Ce fardeau de la preuve est composé du fardeau de présentation (evidential burden) et du fardeau de persuasion (persuasive burden). Ce dernier joue son rôle notamment dans le cas du non liquet: l’état étranger porte le ‘risque d’immunité (immunity risk).

4. Comme la preuve, en matière d’immunité de juridiction, incombe à l’état étranger c’est lui qui commence à fournir des preuves. S’il veut bénéficier de l’immunité de juridiction, l’état étranger doit produire une preuve prima facie (establish a prima facie case) sur deux éléments:

(i) qu’il s’agit d’un ‘état étranger’ (foreign state) selon la définition spécifique de la loi d’immunité (immunity statute) applicable;

(ii) que l’acte en cause fut de nature publique, gouvernementale (de iure imperii).

Pour la preuve de l’élément (ii), l’état étranger n’est pas obligé de réfuter toutes les exceptions prévues par la loi d’immunité, mais il suffit qu’il démontre, de façon plus ou moins générale (par un affidavit ou par d’autres moyens de preuve), l’existence d’un acte gouvernemental. Si le demandeur a précisé, dans sa plaidoirie, les exceptions dont il se prévaut, l’état étranger n’est obligé d’établir sa preuve prima facie que par rapport à ces exceptions.

5. Si l’état étranger a réussi de produire une telle preuve prima facie, le fardeau de présentation se déplace au côté du demandeur (the evidential burden shifts to the plaintiff); celui-ci doit alors prouver les exceptions dont il se prévaut.

6. Si l’état étranger ne réussit pas à réfuter la preuve fournie par le demandeur, l’immunité de juridiction doit être refusée par la cour. Dans le cas d’un non liquet, le ‘risque d’immunité’ — fardeau de persuasion ou imputation du risque de la preuve) est du côté de l’état étranger, de sorte que ce dernier sera débouté de sa demande d’immunité une fois que le demandeur a fourni preuve conclusive par rapport à l’applicabilité d’une exception.

Cette règle ne vaut toutefois pas sans exception; car le cour ne peut pas sans autre refuser l’immunité de juridiction au cas où l’état étranger ne fait rien pour se défendre et, notamment, n’apparaît pas en instance. Dans ce cas, la cour doit fonder sa décision sur l’ensemble des faits et des preuves qui lui ont été soumis par les deux parties. Le résultat de la décision dépendra du poids des preuves. Un jugement par défaut (default judgment) n’est en tout cas possible que sous la condition que le demandeur parvient à prouver ses allégations à la pleine conviction du juge; une preuve prima facie ne suffit pas à cet égard.

7. Ce qui vaut pour l’état étranger lui-même, vaut à fortiori pour ces organismes (agencies; agencies or instrumentalities) ou entités séparées (separate entities). Ceux-ci ne jouissent de l’immunité de juridiction qu’au cas où —

(i) l’état étranger, à leur place, jouirait de l’immunité; et

(ii) ils parviennent à fournir une pleine preuve à l’égard de l’existence d’un acte gouvernemental; une preuve prima facie ne suffit pas.

8. Le fardeau de la preuve est inverse en matière d’immunité d’exécution. Ceci résulte du fait que la règle d’immunité d’exécution garantit une protection pour ainsi dire ‘intégrale’ des biens de l’état étranger, tandis que la règle d’immunité de juridiction n’accorde qu’une immunité ‘résiduelle’ (residual immunity concept).

Dans ce sens, la règle d’immunité d’exécution est toujours ‘absolue.’ Par conséquent, la preuve des conditions factuelles d’une exception à cette règle incombe au demandeur. Si le demandeur ne parvient pas à fournir cette preuve, les bien de l’état étranger jouiront sans autre de l’immunité d’exécution.

Dans le cas du non liquet, le ‘risque d’immunité’ est du côté du demandeur. on peut donc parler d’une règle de preuve in dubio pro immunitate. Une mesure d’exécution par rapport à la propriété d’une banque centrale étrangère ou d’un organisme militaire de l’état étranger est encore plus limitée, voire exclue.

9. Les faits pertinents à prouver par le demandeur sont ceux qui sont énumérés dans les différentes exceptions prévues par les lois en matière d’immunité des états étrangers. Un état étranger, pour prouver prima facie que l’acte en cause fut de nature publique, gouvernementale, peut notamment invoquer d’avoir agi dans le cadre de l’un des domaines ‘sensiblement politiques.’ Ces domaines, élaborés à la suite du FSIA 1976 par la jurisprudence fédérale américaine, forment, dans leur ensemble, une sorte de noyau dur à l’intérieur duquel l’immunité de juridiction bénéficie toujours d’une vaste reconnaissance.

10. En principe, tous les moyens de preuve sont admissibles dans les litiges contre des états étrangers. Il existe une certaine préférence pratique pour le témoignage écrit, un particulier l’affidavit. La qualité de preuve offerte par l’état étranger dépend notamment de la position du témoin dans l’organisation étatique étrangère. Les témoignages des officiels de l’état étranger jouissent, d’après la jurisprudence fédérale américaine, d’une valeur supérieure, concluante (conclusive evidence).


Annex 2

Gibt es eine Beweislastverteilung bei der Immunität von Staaten? Artikel von Peter F. Walter, publiziert in Recht der Internationalen Wirtschaft, Heft 1, Januar 1984, 30 RIW/AWD 9–14 (1984)

Stichworte

Staatenimmunität / Beweislastverteilung / Staatliche Immunitätsregeln / USA / Grossbritannien / Bundesrepublik Deutschland / Beweislastverteilung nach Völkerrecht / Europäische Immunitätskonvention 1971 / Convention der International Law Association / International Law Commission

Einleitung

1. Die Fragestellung des vorliegenden Aufsatzes ist nur denkbar vor dem Hintergrund der sogenannten ‘beschränkten’ (restriktiven) Immunitätsdoktrin, die sich seit etwa der zweiten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts im Zuge steigender Handelsbetätigung der Staaten aus gewinnwirtschaftlichen Motiven, also letztlich im Zusammenhang mit dem sogenannten ‘Wandel der Staatsfunktionen’ aus der früheren absoluten Immunitätsauffassung herausgebildet hat.

— Der vorliegende Aufsatz ist die Zusammenfassung eines Referates, das der Verfasser im Rahmen eines völker- und europarechtlichen Seminars von Professor Dr. Dr. Georg Ress an der Universität des Saarlandes anfertigte. Siehe in diesem Zusammenhang auch den Beschluss des Bundesverfassungsgerichts vom 13. 12. 1977, ZaöRV 1978, 242 ff. und Georg Ress, Entwicklungstendenzen der Immunität ausländischer Staaten, ZaöRV 1980, 217 ff., 243.

Grund dafür ist in erster Linie der Schutz der beteiligten Handelspartner durch die Versagung von Immunität in Fällen, in denen Gegenstand der Klage gegen den betreffenden Staat ein Handelsgeschäft (commercial activity) darstellt, an dem dieser beteiligt war.

— Siehe BVerfGE 16, 27 ff., 34, Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 243 Fn. 7 (Lord Denning) oder auch commercial transactions (Ress, 243, 248).

Die Abgrenzung zwischen Teilnahme am Handelsverkehr (acta iure gestionis) und hoheitlichem Handeln (acta iure imperii) soll nach der Natur des Aktes und nicht nach seinem Zweck — jedenfalls nicht in erster Linie — erfolgen.

— Vgl. Lord Denning MR zit. in der Entscheidung ‘I Congreso del Partido’ des brit. House of Lords vom 16.7. 1981, All England Law Reports (1981) 2 All E R, 1077 und sec. 1603(d) des amerikanischen FSIA v. 21.10.1976 abgedr. als Appendix B in: Reports of the International Law Association 1982 (Belgrad), 241 ff., der lautet: ‘A commercial activity means either a regular course of commercial conduct or a particular commercial transaction or act. The commercial character of an activity shall be determined by reference to the nature of the course of conduct or particular transaction or act, rather than by reference to its purpose.’ Insbesondere Lord Wilberforce (Entscheidung ‘I Congreso’, a.a.O. Fn. 5) ist der Ansicht, dass der Zweck des Aktes jedenfalls insoweit aufschlussreich sei, ‘that it may throw some light on the nature of what was done.’

Heute folgen nahezu all wichtigen westlichen Handelsnationen der Doktrin der beschränkten Immunität.

— So Zwischenergebnis bei Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 244.

2. Die für die Beweislastverteilung in Fällen, in denen ein Staat im Zusammenhang mit seiner Teilnahme am Handelsverkehr verklagt wird, wesentliche Problematik ist nun, ob es diesem Staat nützt, d.h. ob er letztlich doch Immunität beanspruchen kann, wenn er zwar ‘wie ein Privater’ am Handelsverkehr teilgenommen hat (has entered the market place), dann aber — meist aus (aussen–)politischen Gründen — hoheitlich in das Geschäft interveniert und gerade damit die zu der Klage Anlass gebende Vertragsverletzung begeht. Es lässt sich schwerlich leugnen, dass hinter einem Vertragsruch eines rein privatrechtlichen Vertrages zwischen einem Staat und einem Händler durch den beteiligten Staat, also hinter dem vordergründig im Privatrecht angesiedelten Akt (Vertragsbruch, breach of contract) ein hoheitliches Handeln bzw. eine hoheitliche Motivation insbesondere aussenpolitischer Art stehen kann.

— Anders aber Lord Denning vom britischen Court of Appeals in der Entscheidung ‘I Congreso’, zit. nach Ress, 219: ‘When the government of a country enters into an ordinary trading transaction, it cannot afterwards be permitted to repudiate it and get out of its liabilities by saying that it had done it out of high governmental policy or foreign policy or any other policy. It cannot come down lika a god on the stage — the deus ex machina — as if it had nothing to do with it beforehand. It started as a trader and it must end as a trader. It can be sued in the courts of law for its breaches of contract and for its wrongs just as any trader can.’ Lord Wilberforce entgegnete dem treffend (‘I Congreso’, a.a.O. 1071, Fn.5): ‘If a trader is always a trader, a state remains a state and is capable at any time of acts of sovereignty. … The restrictive theory does not and could not deny capability of a state to resort to sovereign, or governmental action: it merely asserts that acts done within the trading or commercial activity are not immune.’ Auch in der Literature wurde die (Extrem–)Ansicht Lord Dennings zurückhaltend aufgenommen, vgl. Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 218, 271: ‘Diese Entwicklung (also die ‘market-place-doctrine’) führt zum Übergriff in einen vom funktionellen staatlich-hoheitlichen Verständnis der Immunität abgedeckten Bereich und ist daher nicht ohne Risiko für das völkerrechtliche Institut der Immunität überhaupt.’

3. Bevor dieser Frage nachgegangen werden soll, muss zunächst erörtert werden, welchem Rechtsgebiet die Beweislastregeln jeweils zu entnehmen sind. Diese Frage ist hinsichtlich des Völkerrechts problematisch, da dieses selbst keine diesbezüglichen Vorschriften enthält.

— Also konkret hinsichtlich der inzwischen vorhandenen völkerrechtlichen Regelungen Europäische Immunitätskonvention von 1972 und der neuen Draft Convention der ILA. Bezüglich des staatlichen Rechts, d.h. staatlichen Immunitätsregelungen, ist dies unproblematisch, da jedenfalls staatliches Recht — also entweder die lex fori (vgl. Firsching, Einführung in das IPR, 2. Aufl., 1981, JuS Schriftenreihe Heft 18, 31) oder soweit die Beweislast im Zusammenhang mit dem zu beurteilenden Rechtsverhältnis geregelt ist, die lex causae (BGHZ 42, 385; Rietzler, Internationales Zivilprozessrecht und prozessuales Fremdenrecht, 1949, 465 ff., Firsching a.a.O.) — zur Anwendung kommt.

Das Völkerrecht als überstaatliches Recht kann schon von seinem Geltungsbereich her schwerlich Beweisregeln der Gerichtsbarkeit enthalten. Überdies ist das Immunitätsrecht gewissermassen als Annex zur Jurisdiktionsgewalt eo ipso staatliches Recht.

— Denkbar wären solche zwar im Rahmen der Gerichtsbarkeit des IGH, indessen kann auch das IGH-Statut keine Beweislastregeln enthalten, da solche dem materiellen Recht und nicht dem Verfahrensrecht angehören. Dem ‘materiellen’ Völkerrecht könnten sie lediglich über die von den Kulturstaaten anerkannten allgemeinen Rechtsgrundsätze gem. Art. 38 I c) IGH-Statut entnommen werden. Die Frage der Jurisdiktionsgewalt richtet sich grundsätzlich nach der lex fori. Um völkerrechtskonform zu handeln, darf der Staat aber bei dieser Frage nicht willkürlich Sachverhalte an seinen Jurisdiktionsbereich anknüpfen, sondern es muss ein ‘certain link’ bestehen. Diese (internationalprivatrechtliche) Fragestellung ist aber lediglich Vorfrage zu der hier vorliegenden Problematik und hat mit dieser somit nichts zu tun (ebenso Ress im statement zur Draft Convention der ILA auf der Montrealkonferenz, ILA Report of the sixteenth conference held at Montreal, 1982, 347).

Das Völkerrecht begrenzt dies lediglich insoweit, als ein Gericht eines Staates nicht Akte eines anderen Staates als acta iure gestionis — und damit immunitätsfrei — erklären darf, wenn diese Akte ‘nach er von den Staaten überwiegend vertretenen Auffassung zum Bereich der Staatsgewalt im engeren und eigentlichen Sinne gehören.’

— Nur ausnahmsweise kann es nach dem Bundesverfassungsgericht, ZaöRV 1978, 278, geboten sein, die Betätigung eines ausländischen Staates, weil sie dem Kernbereich der Staatsgewalt zuzurechnen sei, als Akt iure imperii zu qualifizieren, obwohl sie nach materiellem Recht als privatrechtliche Betätigung anzusehen wäre.

Daher müssen für die vorliegende Fragestellung Kriterien des staatlichen Rechts, das heisst im Rahmen des vorliegenden Aufsatzes Beweislastbegriffe des deutschen und angloamerikanischen Rechts herangezogen werden.

I. Beweislastverteilung nach staatlichen Immunitätsregeln

USA: Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA), 1976

Der FSIA legt Umfang und Grenzen der restrictive immunity abschliessend fest und entzog damit der Exekutive die ihr vorher auf diesem Gebiet eingeräumte Entscheidungskompetenz.

Die Gerichte gewährten vorher lediglich einen minimum standard of justice, im übrigen war die Praxis des amerikanischen Aussenministeriums im Anschluss an den Tate-Letter von 1952 massgebend.

— Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 254 and 256.

Der Act enthält unter chapter 97, sections 1609–1611 ein Regel-Ausnahmeverhältnis (rule and exception principle) in Bezug auf die Gewährung von Immunität für Eigentum ausländischer Staaten auf dem Territorium der USA. Die Ausnahmen der Gewährung von Immunität sind in sections 1610, 1611 abschliessend aufgezählt; im übrigen verbleibt es bei der Immunität als Grundregel (general rule) in §1609.

— §1609 bestimmt, dass besagtes Eigentum ‘shall be immune from attachment, arrest and execution except as provided in sections 1610 and 1611 of this chapter’. Dabei enthält section 1610(a)(2) insbesondere die hier interessierende Ausnahme bezüglich Eigentum, das Gegenstand einer ‘commercial activity’ ist. Was das heisst, wird in §1603(d) definiert.

Die Beweislastverteilung stellt sich also wie folgt dar:

a) Liegt keine der Ausnahmen vor, greift die general rule mit der Folge der Immunität ein; der Staat braucht daher in diesem Falle hoheitliches Handeln nicht nachzuweisen.

b) War Gegenstand der Klage eine ‘commercial activity,’ greift besagte Ausnahmebestimmung ein, d.h. es wird keine Immunität gewährt.

c) Fraglich ist nun, ob trotz des Vorliegens einer der Ausnahmen (prima facie betrachtet) der Nachweis hoheitlichen Handels möglich ist und damit vom betreffenden Staat Immunität beansprucht werden kann. Indessen enthält der Act kein tertium (im Sinne einer Ausnahme von der Ausnahme) für den Fall, dass trotz Vorliegens einer ‘commercial activity’ hoheitliches Handeln im Spiele war. Somit kann sich nach der Systematik des FSIA der Staat nur darauf berufen, dass keine der Ausnahmen vorliege, also den Negativbeweis (Nachweis des Gegenteils) antreten mit der Folge, dass ihm dann die general rule wieder zugute käme. Er müsste also nachweisen,d ass ein Handeln von vornherein ausserhalb der market-place-Sphäre lag. Ein (solchermassen nachträglicher) Nachweis hoheitlichen Handelns ‘im Mantel eines Händlers’ (also trotz unbestrittenen Vorliegens einer der Ausnahmen) lässt der FSIA nicht zu.

Grossbritannien: Der State Immunity Act von 1978 und die alte Rechtslage (insbesondere die Entscheidung ‘I Congreso del Partido’ des House of Lords vom 16. 7. 1981)

Ebenso wie der FSIA enthält der britische Act ein Regel-und-Ausnahme-Prinzip. Dennoch besteht ein bedeutender Unterschied indem bei der Definition der Ausnahme, ‘commercial transaction’ unter Art. 3(3)(c) die Rückausnahme … ‘otherwise than in the exercise of sovereign authority’ gerade zugelassen wird.

— (a) any contract for the supply of goods or services; (b) any loan or other transaction for the provision of finance and by guarantee or indemnity in respect of any such transaction or of any other financial obligation; and (c) any other transaction or activity (whether of a commercial, industrial, financial, professional or other similar character) into which a State enters or in which it engages otherwise than in the exercise of sovereign authority.’ (Zitiert nach Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 248, 249, Fn. 94).

Das Beweislastschema ist hier also um folgendes Tertium bereichert: Statt (b) kann der Staat unter (c) bei Nichtbestreiten des Vorliegens einer Handelsaktivität nachweisen, dass er trotz Teilnahme am Handelsverkehr in Ausübung staatlicher Hoheitsmacht gehandelt hat.

Je nach den Anforderungen, die an den letzteren Nachweis gestellt werden, ergibt die Anwendung dieser Vorschrift eine immunitätsfreundliche oder eher restriktivere Lösung.

Dies zeigt deutlich die Entscheidung des britischen House of Lords vom 16.7.1981 in I Congreso del Partido, [1981] 2 All E R 1064 (H.L.), [1981] 2 Lloyd’s Rep. 367, [1983] 1 A.C. 244, 64 ILR 307 (1983), die noch nach der alten (insoweit aber übereinstimmenden) Rechtslage erging.

— Es ging hier um einen Zuckerlieferungsvertrag zwischen der Republik Kuba und chilenischen Händlern. Kuba (bzw. ein kubanisches Staatsunternehmen) beorderte wegen Wechsels der chilenischen Regierung (Allende-Pinochet) eine Zuckerlieferung vor Eintreffen in Chile zurück. Die chilenischen Händler liessen zur Schadloshaltung ein anderes mit Zucker beladenes kubanisches Schiff im Hafen von London arrestieren. Kuba berief sich im Verfahren auf Immunität wegen aussenpolitischer Zielsetzung seines Handelns (ausführlicher Sachverhalt 1067ff. der Entscheidung). Zur Anwendbarkeit des State Immunity Act 1978 ist zu beachten, dass der Act nur Sachverhalte nach seinem Inkrafttreten erfasst; der vorliegende Sachverhalt spielte sich im Jahre 1973 ab.

Denn hier stellt Lord Wilberforce eben diese Beweislastregel auf — siehe Seite 1072 der Entscheidung — , die, von der restriktiven Theorie ausgehend, die Handlungsweise des verklagten Staates der privatrechtlichen oder hoheitlichen ‘Sphäre’ zuordnet.

Wenn danach eine unter Privatrecht (iure gestionis) fallende Handlungsweise feststeht, seien Vertragsbrüche oder deliktische Verhaltensweisen prima facie auch innerhalb dieses Bereiches angesiedelt. Sache des beklagten Staates sei es dann zu beweisen, dass die infrage stehende Handlungsweise ausserhalb dieser Sphäre angesiedelt war und eine hoheitliche Handlungsweise darstellte. Diese Regel, die mit der des Act übereinstimmt, legt die Beweislast also dem Staat auf, wenn prima facie eine commercial transaction vorliegt und der Staat sich dennoch auf hoheitliches Handeln beruft.

— Vgl. dazu ausführlich Ress, Les tendances de l’évolution de l’immunité de l’état étranger in: Völkerrecht und Landesrecht (Deutsch-Argentinisches Verfassungskolloquium, Buenos Aires, 1979), Berlin, 1982, unter VIII, p. 90: ‘L’opinion soutenue par le Lord Wilberforce revient à la question de savoir à qui incombe la preuve pour la nature de l’acte en cause. S’il y a lieu de relations commerciales entre un gouvernement et un tiers, ce dernier peut prendre la position que toute rupture de contract out action illicite rentre prima facie dans cette catégorie. Il incombe alors au gouvernement en question de fournir des preuves de ce que son action eut lieu en dehors de la sphère économique et, par conséquent, au sein de la sphère des actes publics (acta iure imperii).’

Die Anforderungen allerdings, die an diesen Beweis gestellt werden, sind fast unerfüllbar hoch. Obwohl Lord Wilberforce zunächst einräumt, dass kein Zweifel an der hoheitlichen und nichtkommerziellen Motivation der Republik Kuba beim Zurückordern der Schiffe bestand, lehnt er einen Act iure imperii ab mit der Begründung, dass alles, was die Republik Kuba im Hinblick auf die Playa Larga getan hat, ebensogut von jedem anderen Schiffseigner hätte vorgenommen werden können. Lord Wilberforce stellt also auf die äussere Natur der fraglichen Handlungsweise ab und gesteht nur denjenigen hoheitliche Qualität zu, die nur von einem Staat, nicht aber von einem Privaten vorgenommen werden können. Um solche kann es sich aber bei Interventionen in Handelsgeschäfte zwangsläufig nie handeln, denn in ein Handelsgeschäft eingreifen heisst immer etwas tun, was auch jeder Händler tun kann. Dies kommt einer Aufhebung nahe, was vorher als Beweisregel statuiert wurde. Denn das einzige, was der Staat in dieser Lage tun kann, ist unter Beweis zu stellen, dass er hoheitliche Zwecke mit seiner Handlungsweise verfolgte.

— Ähnlich Lord Edmund-Davies, p. 1082 der Entscheidung: ‘If in these circumstances it be held that the Republic of Cuba cannot rely on state immunity, I find it impossible to imagine circumstances where the doctrine can operate.’ Vgl. auch Ress, Les tendances … p. 91: ‘Interpréter, dans ces circonstances, le comportement du Gouvernement Cubain comme un acte de droit privé, revient à appliquer, de façon implicite, la maxime ‘in dubio contra immunitatem.’ Und p. 90: ‘Comment, cependant, le gouvernement peut-il répondre autrement à l’obligation de fournir des épreuves, si ce n’est pas par un renvoi aux fins politiques poursuivies par son action?’

II. Beweislastverteilung nach Völkerrecht

1. Rechtsprechung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts

Nachdem das Bundesverfassungsgericht sich bereits 1963 mit Fragen der Staatenimmunität befasst hatte und schon damals klarlegte, dass die traditionelle Auffassung von der unbeschränkten Immunität in der Staatenpraxis nicht mehr allgemein anerkannt sei, hat das Gericht in seinem Beschluss vom 13.12.1977 noch einmal ausführlich zur Frage der Immunität fremder Staaten Stellung genommen.

— Obwohl das Bundesverfassungsgericht gem. Art. 100 GG mit dem Ziel prüfte, ob eine allgemeine Regel des Völkerrechts Bestandteil des Bundesrechts ist, sind seine Feststellungen hier nicht im Rahmen des staatlichen Rechts, sondern des Völkerrechts — über das die Entscheidungen gerade Aufschluss geben — interessant. Die Entscheidung von 1963 ist abgedruckt in BVerfGE 16, 27 ff., wo das Gericht bereits entschieden hatte, dass die inländische Gerichtsbarkeit für eine Zahlungsklage gegen einen fremden Staat wegen Reparaturarbeiten an dessen Botschaft gegeben ist. Vgl. die Einführung zum Beschluss vom 13.12.1977 von Hailbronner, ZaöRV 1978, 243 ff., 245.

Es ging um die Zulässigkeit der Zwangsvollstreckung in ein Konto einer ausländischen Botschaft bei einer deutschen Bank.

— Vorausgegangen war ein rechtskräftiges Versäumnisurteil, das die Gläubigerin des Ausgangsverfahrens für rückständige Mietzinsen und Renovierungskosten eines an die Botschaft des beklagten Staates vermieteten Hauses erwirkt hatte. Gegen den Pfändungs- und Überweisungsbeschluss legte der fremde Staat Erinnerung ein.

Das Bundesverfassungsgericht hatte als allgemeine Regel des Völkerrechts festgestellt, dass die Vollstreckung unzulässig ist, soweit ein gerichtlicher Titel gegen den fremden Staat über ein nicht-hoheitliches Verhalten vorliegt, die Gegenstände, in die vollstreckt wird (hier also: das Kontoguthaben), aber hoheitlichen Zwecken des fremden Staates dienen.

— Genau heisst es im Beschluss (a.a.O., p. 259): ‘Die Zwangsvollstreckung durch den Gerichtsstaat aus einem gerichtlichen Vollstreckungstitel gegen einen fremden Staat, der über ein nicht-hoheitliches Verhalten (acta iure gestionis) dieses Staates ergangen ist, in Gegenstände dieses Staates, die sich im Hoheitsbereich des Gerichtsstaates befinden und dort belegen sind, ist, soweit diese Gegenstände im Zeitpunkt des Beginns der Zwangsvollstreckungsmassnahme hoheitlichen Zwecken des fremden Staates dienen, ohne Zustimmung des fremden Staates unzulässig. Forderungen aus einem laufenden, allgemeinen Bankkonto der Botschaft eines fremden Staates, das im Gerichtsstaat besteht und zur Deckung der Ausgaben und Kosten der Botschaft bestimmt ist, unterliegen nicht der Zwangsvollstreckung durch den Gerichtsstaat.’

Das Bundesverfassungsgericht ging also von der Möglichkeit hoheitlicher Zweckbestimmung eines primär oder besser prima facie dem Privatrecht zuzuordnenden Aktes aus. Die Parallele zum Fall ‘I Congreso’ ist augenscheinlich. In beiden Fällen steht — gewissermassen — hinter dem Privatrechtsakt eine hoheitliche Motivation bzw. hoheitliche Zwecke. Der soweit-Satz bring zum Ausdruck, dass für diese hoheitlichen Zwecke der sich auf Immunität berufende Staat die Beweislast trägt. Dafür genügt aber nach dem Bundesverfassungsgericht eine Glaubhaftmachung, es handele sich um ein Konto, das zur Aufrechterhaltung einer diplomatischen Vertretung dient. Der Nachweis wird dem Staat also recht einfach gemacht.

— Dies und die Begründung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts, dass sonst das blosse ‘Ansinnen’ gegenüber dem Entsendestaat, das Bestehen oder die Verwendungszwecke von Geldern auf einem solchen Konto einer Einmischung in die inneren Angelegenheiten eines fremden Staates gleichkäme, wurde vielfach kritisiert (vgl. dazu Ress, ZaöRV 1980, 220 Fn. 6 und 222).

Den (schützenswerten) Vertragspartner verweist das Gericht auf Vereinbarungen ex ante, insbesondere Immunitätsverzichte.

— Auch dies sollte nach Ress, a.a.O., 222, als rechtspolitische Leitlinie (de lege ferenda) überdacht werden.

Die Interessenlage wird also eindeutig pro immunitate beurteilt und steht damit im Gegensatz zur Interessenbewertung in der Entscheidung ‘I Congreso’ des britischen House of Lords.

In seinem neueren Beschluss vom 12.4.1983 hat das Bundesverfassungsgericht allerdings zu erkennen gegeben, dass die extrem immunitätswahrende Entscheidung vom 13.12.1977 nicht verallgemeinerungsfähig ist, sondern nur für den ganz speziellen Bereich diplomatischer Vertretungen von Staaten (als Ausübung von staatlicher Hoheitstätigkeit) Gültigkeit besitzt.

Es ging hier um eine gerichtliche Pfändung von Forderungen der Nationalen Iranischen Ölgesellschaft (NIOC) auf Bankkonten in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. NIOC berief sich auf Immunität mit der Begründung, die Forderungen dienten hoheitlichen Zwecken, da sie aus der Erdölproduktion stammten und nach iranischem Recht solche Forderungen and die Staatshauptkasse bei der Zentralbank des iranischen Staates zu überweisen seien und zur Finanzierung des Staatshaushaltes dienten.

Das im Wege einer Verfassungsbeschwerde angerufene Bundesverfassungsgericht verneinte Immunität auch für den Fall, dass nicht nur die NIOC, sondern sogar der iranische Staat selbst Inhaber der Forderungen wäre.

— Leitsätze in RIW/AWD 1983, 213. Die Botschaftstätigkeit galt von jeher als Domäne staatlicher Hoheitsmacht und Hoheitswürde. Professor Dr. Seidl–Hohenveldern schreibt in seiner Anmerkung RIW 1983, 613 ff., 614 und im Netherlands Yearbook of International Law (1979), 70: ‘It ought to be emphasized that the reasoning of the Federal Constitutional Court is based almost exclusively on customary international law concerning diplomatic relations.’ Hier, Landgericht und Oberlandesgericht als Beschwerdegericht hatten es rechtsfehlerhaft unterlassen, nach Art. 100 Abs. 2 GG die Entscheidung des Bundesverfassungsgerichts einzuholen. Damit konnte das Gericht die — demzufolge nicht entscheidungserhebliche — Frage des Verhältnisses der NIOC, einer im Eigentum der islamischen Republik Iran stehenden Gesellschaft iranischen Rechts — zu ihren ‘Mutterstaat’ offenlassen. Vgl. zu dieser im vorliegenden Zusammenhang wesentlichen und interessanten Fragestellung Khadjavi-Gontard/Hausmann, Die Zurechenbarkeit von Hoheitsakten und subsidiäre Staatshaftung bei Verträgen mit ausländischen Staatsunternehmen, RIW/AWD 1980, 533 ff.

Auch in diesem Fall sei nämlich in der blossen Anweisung zur Weiterleitung der Guthaben an die iranische Zentralbank kein Akt iure imperii zu sehen. Denn damit würden ‘allenfalls mittelbar hoheitliche Zwecke’ verfolgt, da nach dem Willen des fremden Staates die Gelder die massgebende Zweckbestimmung (also Finanzierung des Staatshaushaltes) erst dann erzielten, wenn sie in die Verfügungsgewalt der Zentralbank gelangt seien. Zum hier entscheidenden Zeitpunkt der Anweisung der Gelder liege jedenfalls (noch) keine hoheitliche Zweckbestimmung vor.

— Das Bundesverfassungsgericht konnte also weiter offenlassen, ob diese Zweckbestimmung eine hoheitliche (also Immunität auslösende) sei, indem es lediglich den Akt der Anweisung der Gelder (als im Gerichtsstaat vorgenommener Akt) qualifizierte.

Dem Gerichtsstaat komme in einem solchen Fall die Freiheit der Qualifizierung des Aktes als hoheitlich oder nicht hoheitlich zu, weshalb die Frage, ob die Guthaben nach iranischem Recht als hoheitlichen Zwecken dienend anzusehen seien, nicht entscheidungserheblich sei. Nach deutschem Recht aber unterständen die Guthaben als Teil des staatlichen Finanzvermögens dem Privatrecht.

— Die von Gramlich, RabelsZ (1981) 572 ff., 593 aufgeworfene Frage, ob darin ein Verstoss gegen das völkerrechtliche Interventionsverbot liege, verneint das Bundesverfassungsgericht mit der Begründung, die auf einer abweichenden Qualifikation beruhende gerichtliche Massnahme sei in aller Regal kein Druckmittel des Gerichtsstaates zur Einflussnahme auf die Ausgestaltung der politischen oder wirtschaftlichen Ordnung des fremden Staates. Im übrigen sei die Qualifikation des Bestimmungszweckes eines im Gerichtsstaat befindlichen und dort belegenen Vermögensgegenstandes keine ausschliessliche Angelegenheit des fremden Staates. Interessant ist insoweit der Unterschied zum Beschluss vom 13.12.1977, wo die Offenlegung des Zweckes von Geldern auf Botschaftskonten als eine Einmischung in die inneren Angelegenheiten des fremden Staates angesehen wurde.

Für die hier zu erörternde Beweislastproblematik ergibt sich hieraus folgendes:

a) Das Bundesverfassungsgericht qualifiziert die Guthaben und damit auch die auf sie bezogene Anweisung auf das Konto der iranischen Zentralbank nach deutschem Recht als nicht hoheitlich.

— Im Gegensatz dazu sei bei Guthaben, die der fremde Staat zu währungspolitischen Zwecken bei Banken im Gerichtsstaat unterhalte, in aller Regel ‘unmittelbar’ eine hoheitliche Zweckbestimmung gegeben.

b) Die Frage, ob die Gelder nach ihrem Eingang bei der Zentralbank nach iranischem Recht hoheitlichen Zwecken des Iran dienten, erklärt das Gericht für nicht entscheidungserheblich.

Das Bundesverfassungsgericht eröffnet dem Iran also nicht den Nachweis hoheitlicher Zweckbestimmung der Gelder, indem es zum einen nur auf das deutsche Recht abstellt und zum anderen eine Zeitkomponente ins Spiel bringt. Entscheidender Zeitpunkt sei das Befinden der Guthaben auf deutschen Konten, nicht ihr Eingang bei der iranischen Zentralbank. Auf diese Weise erreicht das Gericht eine sehr restriktive Handhabung des Merkmals ‘hoheitliche Zweckbestimmung’ und damit der Staatenimmunität. Nicht nur dass dem fremden Staat die volle Beweislast für die von ihm behaupteten hoheitlichen Zwecke zukommt, wird dieses Beweisthema noch so eingeengt, dass ihm der Nachweis kaum möglich ist. Unter bewusster Distanzierung zu seinem Beschluss vom 13.12.1977 lässt das Bundesverfassungsgericht erstmals eine Hinwendung zur aktuellen Tendenz einer immer weitergehenden Aberkennung von Immunität im Bereich staatlicher Handelsaktivitäten erkennen.

2. Europäische Immunitätskonvention von 1972

Die Konvention des Europarates vom 16.5.1972 regelt die Immunitätsfrage — wie der FSIA — in einem Regel (Art. 15) und Ausnahme (Art. 1–14) System, in dem Rückausnahmen fehlen.

— Die Konvention ist abgedruckt im Appendix A zum ILA Report of the Fifty-Ninth Conference held at Belgrade 1980, 219 ff.

Daher kann sich auch hier die Beweisfrage nur auf das Eingreifen oder Nichteingreifen eines der Ausnahmetatbestände der Art. 1–14 beziehen. Beruft sich der Staat also auf Immunität, obwohl prima facie einer der Ausnahmetatbestände vorliegt, bleibt ihm nur der Gegenbeweis, also der Nachweis, dass der betreffende Ausnahmetatbestand nicht eingreift.

Wenn der Rechtsstreit also z.B. um ein Patent, Warenzeichen etc. geht, das dem klagenden Staat gehört und das im Forumstaat geschützt ist — für diesen Fall greift der Immunitätsausschluss des Art. 8(a) ein — bliebe dem verklagten Staat nur der Nachweis, die entsprechende Berechtigung falle, aus welchen Gründen auch immer, nicht unter Art. 8(a) mit der Folge, dass dann gemäss Art. 15 Immunität gewährt werden müsste.

Da dieser Nachweis schwierig ist, zeigt gerade das vorliegende Beispiel, denn es ist im Handels- und Rechtsverkehr eindeutig, was als Patent anzusehen ist. Spielraum gibt es lediglich, wenn es um ein ‘ähnliches Recht’ geht, obwohl dieser Nachweis auch recht schwer sein wird, als — unter Nichtbestreiten des Vorliegens eines Ausnahmetatbestandes — hoheitliches Handeln, das mit diesem im Zusammenhang steht, nachzuweisen ist. Hoheitliche Intervention in einen Akt iure gestionis berechtigt den Staat nach der Konvention also nicht, Immunität zu beanspruchen, wenn er den Privatrechtscharakter des Aktes, in den er interveniert, nicht zu bestreiten vermag bzw. den Gegenbeweis nicht erbringen kann. Es gilt also auch hier gleiches wie für den FSIA.

3. Draft Convention der International Law Association

Nachdem die ILA das Thema ‘State Immunity’ bereits auf der Manila-Konferenz (1978) erörtert hatte, wurde auf der Belgrad-Konferenz (1980) von der dafür eigens eingesetzten Arbeitsgruppe ein ‘Preliminary Report’ vorgelegt. Schliesslich kam es dann zu der hier erörterten ‘Draft Convention’ und dem darauf bezogenen ‘Final Report’, eine Art Kommentierung derselben.

— ILA Report of the Fifty-Eighth Conference held at Manila 1978, 439. Resolution No. 6 (1982) in ILA Report of the Sixteenth Conference held at Montreal, 1983, 5.

Schon auf der Belgrad-Konferenz wurde die Frage aufgeworfen, ob eine ‘general rule’ mit ‘exceptions’ — wie im FSIA und der europäischen Konvention — geschaffen werden sollte, was zur Folge hätte, dass immer dann, wenn eine der Ausnahme eingriffe, Immunität beansprucht werden könnte. So hat man sich zunächst einmal für eine Differenzierung nach Erkenntnis– und Vollstreckungsverfahren entschieden, und für ersteres schliesslich doch eine general rule in Art II. mit exceptions in Art. III statuiert.

— A.a.O., 329; im übrigen kein neuer Gedanke. Zuerst hatte man erwogen hatte, die general rule wegzulassen und nur die Ausnahmefälle zu statuieren. Art. II lautet: ‘In general, a foreign State shall be immune from the adjudicatory jurisdiction of a forum State for acts performed by it in the exercise of its sovereign authority, i.e. iure imperii. It shall not be immune in the circumstances provided in Article III.’ Art. III schliesst Immunität u.a. aus für ‘a commercial activity carried on wholly or partly in the forum State by the foreign state.’

Weiterhin hat man die Beweislast gerade entgegengesetzt geregelt, um im Erkenntnisverfahren eine ‘somewhat flexible rule,’ im Vollstreckungsverfahren dagegen eine strikte Immunitätsregelung zu erzielen.

— A.a.O., 329, Fn. 45. ‘… there should be an absolute rule of immunity unless a particular exception applied. (Id.)

Das zeigt am anschaulichsten ein Vergleich der beiden Grundregeln, also Art. II und Art. VII. Schon der Wortlaut offenbart hier m.E. sehr deutlich die unterschiedliche Beweislastregelung. Nach der strikten Regel des Art. VII verbleibt es bei Nichtvorliegen einer Ausnahme des Art. VIII bei der Immunität, ohne dass der Staat noch besonders hoheitliches Handeln nachzuweisen hätte.

— Art. VII lautet: ‘A foreign State’s property in the forum State shall be immune from attachment, arrest and execution except as provided in Article VIII.’

Die Beweislast für das Vorliegen einer Ausnahme trägt der Vertragspartner des Staates, also der Kläger, wenn er sich auf diese ihm günstige Tatsache beruft. Kann er diesen Nachweis nicht führen, wird Immunität ohne Nachweis hoheitlichen Handelns gewährt; für letzteren Nachweis obliegt dem Staat also keinerlei Beweislast.

— Dies wurde bei den Ausführungen zum FSIA und zur europäischen Immunitätskonvention nicht explizit gesagt und sei hiermit nachgetragen. Es ergab sich aber auch daraus, dass von ‘Gegenbeweis’ die Rede war. Mit diesem ist natürlich jede Prozesspartei ‘belastest’; die eigentliche Beweislast trägt in diesem Fall aber der Kläger und nicht der beklagte Staat.

Ganz anders die Regelung in Art. II. Hier lautet es schon einleitend: ‘In general …’ und dann vor allem einschränkend ‘for acts performed by it in the exercise of its sovereign authority, i.e. iure imperii.’ In den Fällen, in denen ein Ausnahmetatbestand des Art. III eingreift, ist das Schema wie oben. Liegt aber keine der Ausnahmen vor, bzw. kann der Vertragspartner des Staates als Kläger eine solche nicht nachweisen, ändert sich die Regelung. Denn hier wird nicht sozusagen automatisch Immunität gewährt, sondern nur für die Fälle, in denen der Staat hoheitliches Handeln nachweist. Dafür trägt der beklagte Staat die Beweislast. Dieser Beweis dürfte ihm allerdings in den Fällen, in denen keine der Ausnahmen eingreift, bzw. nicht nachgewiesen werden kann, in denen also z.B. keine commercial activity i.S. von Art. III B vorliegt, nicht schwerfallen.

— Vgl. Final Report, a.a.O., 329. Die Definition ähnelt sehr der des FSIA.

Andererseits — dies ist das Entscheidende — schliesst die Regelung aber auch den Fall nicht aus, dass trotz Vorliegens einer Ausnahme der Staat sich auf hoheitliches Handeln beruft, wie es im Falle ‘I Congreso’ gerade der Fall war. Zwar schliesst Art. III Immunität für die angeführten Ausnahmefälle aus, diese sind aber Ausprägungen von Handlungsweisen iure gestionis. Die Möglichkeit, das Vorliegen eines Aktes iure imperii über Art. II nachzuweisen, wird also nicht durch Art. III ausgeschlossen. Die bei Nichtvorliegen eines Ausnahmetatbestandes einschränkend wirkende Fassung des Art II. (Beweislast), wirkt bei Vorliegen einer Ausnahme erweiternd; es wird — wie beim britischen Act — ein tertium zugelassen, das dem beklagten Staat gestattet, trotz Vorliegens einer immunitätsausschliessenden Ausnahme den Nachweis hoheitlichen Handelns (also z.B. hoheitlicher Motivation zu vertragsbrüchigem Eingriff in ein Privatrechtsgeschäft) anzutreten.

Für diesen Nachweis trägt der beklagte Staat dann wiederum die Beweislast. (Art. II), obwohl es hier, wie gezeigt, entscheidend auf die Anforderungen ankommt, die an diesen Nachweis gestellt werden.

4. Bemühungen der International Law Commission

Nachdem die ILC bereits durch eine Arbeitsgruppe eine Reihe von Reporten hatte vorbereiten lassen, wurden vom Special Rapporteur Sompong Sucharitkul drei Reporte vorgelegt. Der 2nd Report stellt erstmals eine Art Konventionsentwurf dar; er fasst in sechs Draft Artikeln (Part I: Introduction, Art. 1–5; Part II: General Principles, Art. 6) den vorläufigen Forschungs– und Quellenstand zusammen. Abgeschossen wurde dieser durch einen 3rd Report, der die übrigen Artikel 7–11 vorlegt.

— Sompong Sucharitkul, Second Report on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and Their Property in: Yearbook of the International Law Commission 1980, Volume II, Part One, 199 ff. The 3rd Report is published in Yearbook of the International Law Commission 1981, Volume II, Part Two, 153 ff. Zum Zeitpunkt der Verfassung des vorliegenden Artikels (1984), wurden von der Commission angenommen lediglich die Artikel 1 und 6.

Artikel 6 enthält eine ‘general rule’ und legt das Prinzip der Staatenimmunität fest. Der für die vorliegende Fragestellung einschlägige Artikel 7 wurde nach mehreren heftigen Diskussionen nicht angenommen.

— Article 6 State Immunity: 1. A State is immune from the jurisdiction of another State in accordance with the provisions of the present articles. 2. Effect shall be given to State immunity in accordance with the provisions of the present articles.’ Article 7 Rules of Competence and Jurisdictional Immunity: 1. A State shall give effect to State immunity under article 6 by refraining from submitting another State to its jurisdiction, notwithstanding its authority under its rules of competence to conduct the proceedings in a given case. Alternative A 2. A legal proceeding is considered to be one against another State, whether or not named as a party, so long as the proceeding in fact impleads that other State. Alternative B. 2. In particular, a State shall not allow a legal action to proceed against another State, or against any of its organs, agencies or instrumentalities acting as a sovereign authority, or against one of its representatives in respect of acts performed by them in their official functions, or permit a proceeding which seeks to deprive another State of its property or of the use of property in its possession or control.’ (Yearbook of the International Law Commission 1981, Volume I, 56.

Dies verwundert nicht, geht die Regelung doch an der eigentlichen Problematik vorbei, indem sie zum einen Jurisdiktionsgewalt, Verantwortlichkeit der Staaten für ihre Organe und zum dritten die Frage der Immunität in einem Artikel behandelt und zum anderen das Problem der Immunität selbst — also insbesondere die Abgrenzung von Akten, für die keine Immunität beansprucht werden kann, von Hoheitsakten — nicht eingehend regelt.

Hier beschränkt sich nämlich die Vorschrift in Alternative B auf das Postulat: ‘Keine Jurisdiktion über hoheitlich handelnde Staaten;’ dies ist nichts Besonderes und war seit jeher anerkannt.

— Es handelt sich hier recht besehen nicht um Alternativen, da in beiden völlig unterschiedliches geregelt wird.

Die (neuere) Problematik restriktiver Immunität hingegen wird gerade nicht geregelt. Es fehlt jede Auseinandersetzung mit dem Problem der Handelsbetätigung von Staaten und ihre Folgen für die Immunität bzw. Entscheidung über die (konträre) Interessenlage zwischen Händler auf der einen und Staat auf der anderen Seite.

In der Tat erscheint die Regelung des Art. 7 verunglückt infolge Vermischung verschiedener Fragestellungen in einem einzigen Artikel, der Überbetonung der Jurisdiktionsfrage, der unpräzisen Fassung und des Fehlens von Ausnahmetatbeständen für Staatenimmunität im Zusammenhang mit acta iure gestionis. Die Arbeit der ILC ist jedoch noch nicht abgeschlossen und eine Revision durch den Special Rapporteur wird vorgenommen.

Schlussbetrachtung

Die eingangs gestellte Frage nach einer Beweislastregel bei der Immunität von Staaten ist mit ‘ja’ zu beantworten. Sowohl in den erörterten staatlichen und internationalen Immunitätsregelungen, als auch in der angeführten Rechtsprechung, wird in Fällen eines gerichtlichen Vorgehens gegen Staaten im Zusammenhang mit von diesen betriebenen Handelsaktivitäten implizit eine Beweislastverteilung vorgenommen. Die einzelnen Regelungen unterscheiden sich lediglich darin, dass der beklagte Staat bei Vorliegen eines der Immunität ausschliessenden Tatbestandes entweder nur diesen bestreiten oder aber einen gesonderten Nachweis hoheitlicher Zweckbestimmung seines Handelns führen kann. In beiden Fällen trägt er dafür aber die Beweislast.

Die angeführte Rechtsprechung geht — ohne dies immer im Detail explizit auszuführen — im Grunde auch von dieser Beweislastverteilung aus.

Im einzelnen bestehen jedoch je nach Bewertung der konkreten Interessenlage graduelle Unterschiede hinsichtlich der Anforderungen, die an den Nachweis hoheitlicher Zweckbestimmung geknüpft werden.

Dabei ist die allgemeine Tendenz zu verzeichnen, entweder durch eins ehr hohes Ansetzen der Beweisanforderungen, oder ein weitgehendes Einschränken des Beweisthemas, die Staatenimmunität im Bereich staatlicher Handelsaktivitäten nur noch in Ausnahmefällen zu gewähren, bzw. — allgemein gesprochen — das Institut der Staatenimmunität langsam aus diesem Bereich zu verdrängen.

— Wie gezeigt, entschied das britische House of Lords durch Hochschrauben der Beweisanforderungen sehr zugunsten der beteiligten Händler und damit in hohem Masse immunitätseinschränkend. Wie hoch nach dem britischen Act von 1978 oder gar nach der Draft Convention der ILA die Anforderungen an den Nachweis hoheitlichen Handelns trotz Vorliegens einer ‘commercial activity’ ausfallen werden, ist jedenfalls bezüglich letzterer noch ungewiss. Bezüglich des britischen Act wird die I Congreso Rechtsprechung des House of Lords entscheidende präjudizielle Wirkung haben. Man kann diese Entscheidung wohl als einen ‘leading case’ bezeichnen.


©2015 Peter Fritz Walter. Some rights reserved.
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Advertisements