The Hexagrams


Book Contents

Preface
Introduction
The Technique
Base Structure of the I Ching
The Hexagrams
 — 01 QIAN (Yang) — 02 KUN (Yin) — 03 TUN (Difficult Beginning) — 04 MENG (Immaturity) — 05 XU (Waiting Patiently) — 06 SONG (Dispute) — 07 SHI (The Army) — 08 BI (Fellowship) — 09 XIAO CHU (Small Accumulation) — 10 LI (Conduct) — 11 TAI (Peace) — 12 PI (Obstacle) — 13 TONG REN (Fellowship) — 14 DA YOU (Great Harvest) — 15 QIEN (Modesty) — 16 YU (Enthusiasm) — 17 SUI (Compliance) — 18 GU (Correcting the Corruption) — 19 LIN (Advancing) — 20 GUAN (Contemplation) — 21 SHI HO (Biting Through Hardship) — 22 BI (Adornment) — 23 BO (Erosion) — 24 FU (Return) — 25 WU WANG (Innocence) — 26 DA CHU (Great Potential) — 27 YI (Nourishment) — 28 DA GUO (Critical Mass) — 29 KAN (Watery Depths) — 30 LI (Fire) — 31 XIAN (Mutual Attraction) — 32 HENG (Constancy) — 33 DUN (Retreat) — 34 DA ZHUANG (Power of the Great) — 35 JIN (Success) — 36 MING YI (Time of Darkness) — 37 JIA REN (Family) — 38 KUI (Contradiction) — 39 JIAN (Obstruction) — 40 JIE (Dissolution of the Problem) — 41 SUN (Sacrifice) — 42 YI (Benefit) — 43 GUAI (Resolution) — 44 GOU (Contact) — 45 CUI (Congregation) — 46 SHENG (Rising) — 47 KUN (Adversity) — 48 JING (The Well) — 49 GE (Revolution) — 50 DING (The Cauldron) — 51 ZHEN (Force of Thunder) — 52 GEN (Keeping Still) — 53 JIAN (Gradual Progress) — 54 GUI MEI (The Maiden) — 55 FENG (Peak) — 56 LU (The Wanderer) — 57 XUN (Gentle Wind) — 58 DUI (Joyousness) — 59 HUAN (Scattered) — 60 JIE (Self-Restraint) — 61 ZHONG FU (Inner Truth) — 62 XIAO GUO (Predominance of the Small) — 63 JI JI (After Crossing the Water) — 64 WEI JI (Before Crossing the Water)

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Dispute / Conflict / Inner Struggle

Tension. It may indicate contention. It may be an inner struggle.

This hexagram traditionally is about conflict with others, a state of contention or a litigation. But it can as well apply for an inner struggle. You are likely to receive it in a reading when you have two ‘talking’ voices within you, one that wants to go ahead, and the other that wants you to stop. In such a case, you need to develop good judgment.

1. Avoid dispute and make peace. If you are bothered by gossip or if others treat you with lacking respect, forgive them, but go your way and believe in your inner values.

2. Pure willpower is often in life not a good recipe for success. Here, patience and tolerance are needed for dissolving a dispute outwardly, or within yourself. You may need to make concessions in a dispute, or you may gain clarity about what you really want. Retreat is a good action for now!

3. The advice here is to run a low profile and avoid public prominence. If you heed this advice and you remain cautious, you may eventually succeed. But do not start new undertakings now!

4. The traditional interpretation of this line is that one’s grievance has been rejected. It is thus recommended to avoid the conflict altogether by not insisting and making peace. A favorable response may then occur.

5. In this position, you may well proceed with a grievance or litigation. As you are guided by correct principles, you will be successful and dispute can be dissolved. This line may also indicate that you have found inner peace by dissolving conflict within. It is thus favorable to go ahead!

6. The I Ching always advises against competition. Your position here is that while you have won the dispute, you have stirred up an envious reaction in others. Thus to insist until the end is not favorable. The traditional interpretation of this line speaks of a leather belt that was bestowed because of winning a litigation, but that will be snatched away many times. This metaphor teaches the importance of inner poise, harmony and peace of mind, which have higher values than the momentary winning of a dispute. Hence the need for inner reflection and, if necessary, of wistful retreat.

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