The Hexagrams


Book Contents

Preface
Introduction
The Technique
Base Structure of the I Ching
The Hexagrams
 — 01 QIAN (Yang) — 02 KUN (Yin) — 03 TUN (Difficult Beginning) — 04 MENG (Immaturity) — 05 XU (Waiting Patiently) — 06 SONG (Dispute) — 07 SHI (The Army) — 08 BI (Fellowship) — 09 XIAO CHU (Small Accumulation) — 10 LI (Conduct) — 11 TAI (Peace) — 12 PI (Obstacle) — 13 TONG REN (Fellowship) — 14 DA YOU (Great Harvest) — 15 QIEN (Modesty) — 16 YU (Enthusiasm) — 17 SUI (Compliance) — 18 GU (Correcting the Corruption) — 19 LIN (Advancing) — 20 GUAN (Contemplation) — 21 SHI HO (Biting Through Hardship) — 22 BI (Adornment) — 23 BO (Erosion) — 24 FU (Return) — 25 WU WANG (Innocence) — 26 DA CHU (Great Potential) — 27 YI (Nourishment) — 28 DA GUO (Critical Mass) — 29 KAN (Watery Depths) — 30 LI (Fire) — 31 XIAN (Mutual Attraction) — 32 HENG (Constancy) — 33 DUN (Retreat) — 34 DA ZHUANG (Power of the Great) — 35 JIN (Success) — 36 MING YI (Time of Darkness) — 37 JIA REN (Family) — 38 KUI (Contradiction) — 39 JIAN (Obstruction) — 40 JIE (Dissolution of the Problem) — 41 SUN (Sacrifice) — 42 YI (Benefit) — 43 GUAI (Resolution) — 44 GOU (Contact) — 45 CUI (Congregation) — 46 SHENG (Rising) — 47 KUN (Adversity) — 48 JING (The Well) — 49 GE (Revolution) — 50 DING (The Cauldron) — 51 ZHEN (Force of Thunder) — 52 GEN (Keeping Still) — 53 JIAN (Gradual Progress) — 54 GUI MEI (The Maiden) — 55 FENG (Peak) — 56 LU (The Wanderer) — 57 XUN (Gentle Wind) — 58 DUI (Joyousness) — 59 HUAN (Scattered) — 60 JIE (Self-Restraint) — 61 ZHONG FU (Inner Truth) — 62 XIAO GUO (Predominance of the Small) — 63 JI JI (After Crossing the Water) — 64 WEI JI (Before Crossing the Water)

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The Army / Military Leadership / Collective Power

Learn the art of leadership.

This hexagram indicates that great things can be achieved with cooperation and a good sense of leadership. The importance is to take responsibility and to have a non-selfish attitude for making things happen by firing others up with respect and enthusiasm.

1. This line teaches that selfish motives are not appropriate in a position of leadership, hence the need for self-restraint and for building an ‘orderly’ mindset and attitude. This means that you need to be organized from the start in order to avoid failure for yourself and those who are close to you.

2. This line predicts a favorable result because there is good communication. The traditional interpretation speaks of being empowered by the King. This means that yin and yang are in correct balance, so you can advance toward your goal.

3. This line speaks of the defeat of an army. Psychologically, this indicates that one lacks leadership skills. While your intentions may be good, you need to control any lofty ambitions by making sure you have the ability to carry things through to the end. If you see that this is not the case, retreat is the best thing to do.

4. This line is an extension of the 3rd line in that it teaches the way how to retreat safely. It indicates that the situation is such that in your present position you cannot win and should thus retreat. The traditional interpretation emphasizes that one should never feel humiliated by retreat.

5. Here, the I Ching consults to appoint an experienced leader for handling the situation. Thus assignments should be clearly given, and the leader must carefully match the right person with the appropriate duty — otherwise you may run into failure. If you are not in a situation of leadership outwardly, this line may also apply to your inner ‘team’ in that you may be advised to take a leadership position in the face of contradicting inner voices, and take a responsible action based upon self-reflection.

6. Take special care in delegating duties. You have basically made it through but you need to be careful what kind of people you are sharing your success with. Avoid petty people and give rewards only to those who have deserved it. This line may also be interpreted as reflecting a person who as a leader needs to be a good manager as well, thus fulfilling two roles in one person.

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