The Hexagrams


Book Contents

Preface
Introduction
The Technique
Base Structure of the I Ching
The Hexagrams
 — 01 QIAN (Yang) — 02 KUN (Yin) — 03 TUN (Difficult Beginning) — 04 MENG (Immaturity) — 05 XU (Waiting Patiently) — 06 SONG (Dispute) — 07 SHI (The Army) — 08 BI (Fellowship) — 09 XIAO CHU (Small Accumulation) — 10 LI (Conduct) — 11 TAI (Peace) — 12 PI (Obstacle) — 13 TONG REN (Fellowship) — 14 DA YOU (Great Harvest) — 15 QIEN (Modesty) — 16 YU (Enthusiasm) — 17 SUI (Compliance) — 18 GU (Correcting the Corruption) — 19 LIN (Advancing) — 20 GUAN (Contemplation) — 21 SHI HO (Biting Through Hardship) — 22 BI (Adornment) — 23 BO (Erosion) — 24 FU (Return) — 25 WU WANG (Innocence) — 26 DA CHU (Great Potential) — 27 YI (Nourishment) — 28 DA GUO (Critical Mass) — 29 KAN (Watery Depths) — 30 LI (Fire) — 31 XIAN (Mutual Attraction) — 32 HENG (Constancy) — 33 DUN (Retreat) — 34 DA ZHUANG (Power of the Great) — 35 JIN (Success) — 36 MING YI (Time of Darkness) — 37 JIA REN (Family) — 38 KUI (Contradiction) — 39 JIAN (Obstruction) — 40 JIE (Dissolution of the Problem) — 41 SUN (Sacrifice) — 42 YI (Benefit) — 43 GUAI (Resolution) — 44 GOU (Contact) — 45 CUI (Congregation) — 46 SHENG (Rising) — 47 KUN (Adversity) — 48 JING (The Well) — 49 GE (Revolution) — 50 DING (The Cauldron) — 51 ZHEN (Force of Thunder) — 52 GEN (Keeping Still) — 53 JIAN (Gradual Progress) — 54 GUI MEI (The Maiden) — 55 FENG (Peak) — 56 LU (The Wanderer) — 57 XUN (Gentle Wind) — 58 DUI (Joyousness) — 59 HUAN (Scattered) — 60 JIE (Self-Restraint) — 61 ZHONG FU (Inner Truth) — 62 XIAO GUO (Predominance of the Small) — 63 JI JI (After Crossing the Water) — 64 WEI JI (Before Crossing the Water)

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Conduct / Behavior / Attitude

Pay close attention to your conduct. Do things appropriately.

This hexagram is all about conduct, who people behave in society, and which attitude is appropriate in different situations. It is an important hexagram in that peace and order flow out from good human conduct, while even the strictest criminal law will not be able to prevent, let alone eradicate criminal behavior. Sometimes a bad attitude can spoil the best cause.

1. Conduct yourself simply and naturally. Do not assume obligations in this position for you depend too much on the goodwill of others. The I Ching teaches throughout that when neither honor nor disgrace are imposed on a plain good life, one achieves happiness.

2. Simplicity and modesty (moderation) are safeguarding a tranquil life. Do not get entangled in other people’s dreams and do not expect favors from others, nor any high position or honor. Then you preserve your inner peace.

3. This line traditionally speaks of a person who steps on the tail of a tiger and is bitten. It’s a situation of danger caused by lacking foresight, arrogance or excessive ambition. The advice in this situation is to be flexible and avoid a rigid stubborn attitude. It is also important to maintain inner coherence and avoid being misled by hot temper or resentment.

4. In this situation, you have mastered the danger indicated by the 3rd line, because one has been prudent and flexible. Now you can proceed with your project or endeavor.

5. There is danger in this position but if you can muster self-discipline and you have a true understanding of the situation, you can go prudently ahead. If you feel that it’s not worth the effort, you may want to change your goals. Here advancement means to have gained wisdom through understanding one’s past.

6. Check out your conduct now and in the past. The law of karma is but cause and effect depending on the nature of our actions. If you are able to gain a certain objectiveness in assessing your behavior, you can achieve high in your life, for you will see that you reap what you sow. Hence the need to refresh your attitude from time to time.

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